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Social Media Policies – and a $70,000 Multnomah County Job

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Social director” used to be viewed as a job for the boss’s wife or a job for paid “social butterfly.” but the 21st century “social media” director has education, imagination, writing skills, and respect. The life of a PIO will never be the same again.

Multnomah County has opened up a job for a “Chair’s Office Communication Director/Multnomah County Social Media Coordinator.” It closes on 5/20/09, so don’t dawdle.

Do you tweet and use Facebook? Are you experienced with building social communities? Can you crank out news releases, editorials, and web content on tight deadlines? Have you been a one-person video crew? Are you a stickler for grammar and punctuation? Do you know your way around web tools, web development and search engine optimization?

Multnomah County is seeking a motivated and experienced communicator, with a passion for writing, blogging, and social media in a fast-paced environment. The successful candidate will have PR and media experience, the ability to jump between creative and analytical skills, solid verbal and written communication expertise, and a marketing perspective. If you think strategically and are skilled at 21st century media technology, this might be the position for you….“ (for full job post, until job ad is pulled)

A recent post on social media policies, Should Your Company have a Social Media Policy?, has opened up the discussion of this subject beyond the desultory, “why don’t we have a policy” questions.

This is not a new subject of discussion, but it seems that management is a little behind the social media, the interactive web, curve – and maybe even very far behind their employees so the policy makers havea lot of catching up to do. Waiting until problems arise before taking action is nothing new, and is quite human despite the fact we could, with a little foresight and planning, do otherwise.

You can Google the words social media policies for a start, but there is more from your professional associations and colleagues.

(See my pevious blog post on public sector blogging and links to the policies at the Multnomah County Library).