We the People Book Club (Classroom Law Project)

Even if we don’t join all those book clubs dangled so temptingly (ahem) in front of us, we can still add their books to our personal reading lists.

But if you are inclined to join a Lucky Lab CLP book group meet-up and if you’re a bit of a law and governement wonk, here’s a book club for you:

We the People Book Club, which meets at the Lucky Lab, will be reading the following books:

“It can be hard to keep up with all the great books about American government and democracy. Back by popular demand is a a book club where we will explore great books — loosely related to the Units in the WTP text — with great friends over a pretty good dinner. Leading book club discussions is the always insightful Susie Marcus and with her Shelley Larkins, the winning, inquisitive and fun attorney coach from Grant HS’s Con Team.

•Tuesday, Dec. 3 Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham
•Tuesday, Feb. 25 Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Life Among the Lowly by Harriet Beecher Stowe
•Tuesday, Apr. 29 Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy by Gary May
•Tuesday, May 27 Peyote vs. the State: Religious Freedom on Trial by Garrett Epps
•Tuesday, Jun. 17 My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor…” [Read the blog post and visit the CLP homepage.]

2014 Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction accepting entries

“2014 Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction accepting entries

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the publication of To Kill A Mockingbird, and to honor former Alabama law student and author Harper Lee, The University of Alabama School of Law and the ABA Journal partnered together to create the Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction in 2010. The prize, authorized by Ms. Lee, is given annually to a book-length work of fiction ….” [Link to announcement.]

Lawyer Referrals for Jail and Prison Inmates in Oregon

Lawyer referrals in Oregon are made through the Oregon State Bar and, occasionally, from local or specialized bar associations and nonprofits. (The Oregon State Bar has a public website where you can check to make sure the lawyer is licensed to practice law in Oregon.)

Requests for a referral from the Oregon State Bar are made through email or telephone.

But what happens if you are in jail or prison? Here’s the information we got from the OSB Referral Service:

“… inmates can’t always get through. They can’t call 800 numbers at all and the 503 number requires the caller to navigate through a bunch of “press 1 if you want…” “press 63 if you need”, which doesn’t work with the prison system phone service.

The OSB Referral Service also said that “they receive a good number of written requests from inmates looking for referrals. And, they respond to them in writing. For outlying penitentiaries, [they] acknowledged that the OSB Service is slim on attorneys to refer, but that a “city-lawyer” would typically take these cases and be willing to travel to visit the inmate (if they had money to pay for representation).”

How to Preserve and Collect Cartoon Art

Is a cartoon library worth $10 million? You bet it is, if consider the history and the joy it contains.

The Cartoon Library at Ohio State University is a one place to start your cartoon preservation and collection research. Heaven knows archivists know about preservation of printed, and other, materials – and while heaven might look fondly upon archivists, it tests them mightily to see if they are worthy of persisting on such a quixotic journey. Talk about a dream job – a Cartoon Archivist.  As Mark Twain apocryphally advised writers: make ‘em laugh and make ‘em cry. That’s good cartooning (and librarianship) in a nutshell.

And possibly just worth the long journey to Columbus, Ohio:  Bill Watterson (Calvin & Hobbes) and Richard Thompson (Cul de Sac) will appear on the same stage in the Spring 2014 at Ohio State. Wowsers!

Job: Bridge Operator, Portland (Oregon) (not legal, but very high cool factor)

This position is responsible for the opening and closing of the movable draw spans of the Hawthorne, Morrison, Broadway and Burnside Bridges.

Visit the Multnomah County Job Opportunities website.

Job Code: 6059-11
Job Title: Bridge Operator
Closing Date/Time: Mon. 11/04/13 11:59 PM Pacific Time

Multnomah County’s Department of Community Services is accepting applications for a full-time Bridge Operator.

The first 50 applications will be screened. This recruitment will be closed once the 50 applications are received. You are encouraged to apply without delay.

This position is responsible for the opening and closing of the movable draw spans of the Hawthorne, Morrison, Broadway and Burnside Bridges. Duties will include, but are not limited to:

  • operating bridge controls in a safe and timely manner
  • maintaining a constant watch for visual or sound signals from boats requiring bridge opening
  • operating a two-way radio for communication with river traffic,
  • observing and reporting unusual activity on or around bridges
  • performing minor maintenance of machinery related to the draw span and their traffic gates (clean, inspect, and maintain bridge mechanisms and facilities”

And maybe someone will FINALLY create an app so we can know when the bridges are going to open!

(No, you probably don’t have a chance, and in fact, if you weren’t alerted to this opening before now and don’t have your application ready to go, you really, really don’t have a chance. But one can dream, can’t one?)

Improvements to the Oregon Legal Research Blog: Tags and Comments

News from Oregon Legal Research Central:

1) We now have a Tag Cloud at the blog (right side, scroll down). Let me know if it works for you or if there is another way you like to find subject-specific blog posts, which leads to the second change ….

2) We’ve also changed the Comment functionality so people can Comment without having to log in. Yay! I hadn’t realized that logging in was necessary and once I found out I went to our fab-host, Justia, to fix the problem. They did so promptly!  (And thank you also to our reader who emailed us directly when she realized the log-in/privacy problem – and the disincentive to Commenting it presented.)