How to Press Ctrl-Alt-Delete with One Hand and Other One-Hand Keyboard Accessibility Tips

I like “using your keyboard one handed” from AbilityNet dot org in the U.K. (with or without Scotland).

There are lots of other instructions on searching the interwebs with one hand, e.g. use these search words: control alt delete one handed or computer keyboard one hand or other variations that tickle your fancy.

Summer Reading: Law and Non-law Fiction for Attorneys

The Oregon State Bar’s Ian Pisarcik, Legal Publications Attorney Editor, gives us a list of intriguing books for our reading pleasure:

As an attorney, two things are reasonably certain to occur in your lifetime: Sallie Mae will deduct an astronomically high student loan payment from your checking account and someone, somewhere will ask you if you’ve read To Kill a Mockingbird and if you were aware that John Grisham used to be a real honest-to-God practicing attorney. It is at this point that you will calmly try to explain that you read more than just legal thrillers...” Link to Ian’s blog post and current list of recommendations.

How to Find the Right Domain Name? Are you .Cool? .Blue? .Futbol? .Expert?

Have you checked out domain names recently? They include this small sample:

.bike, .blue, buzz, .camp, .ceo, .cool, .expert, .futbol, .guru, .pink, .recipes, .tips, .solutions, .tattoo., .training, and hundreds more.

Find lists of other domain names:

Wikipedia List of Internet Top Level Domains

Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) and their Root Zone Database.

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We the People Book Club (Classroom Law Project)

Even if we don’t join all those book clubs dangled so temptingly (ahem) in front of us, we can still add their books to our personal reading lists.

But if you are inclined to join a Lucky Lab CLP book group meet-up and if you’re a bit of a law and governement wonk, here’s a book club for you:

We the People Book Club, which meets at the Lucky Lab, will be reading the following books:

“It can be hard to keep up with all the great books about American government and democracy. Back by popular demand is a a book club where we will explore great books — loosely related to the Units in the WTP text — with great friends over a pretty good dinner. Leading book club discussions is the always insightful Susie Marcus and with her Shelley Larkins, the winning, inquisitive and fun attorney coach from Grant HS’s Con Team.

•Tuesday, Dec. 3 Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham
•Tuesday, Feb. 25 Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Life Among the Lowly by Harriet Beecher Stowe
•Tuesday, Apr. 29 Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy by Gary May
•Tuesday, May 27 Peyote vs. the State: Religious Freedom on Trial by Garrett Epps
•Tuesday, Jun. 17 My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor…” [Read the blog post and visit the CLP homepage.]

2014 Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction accepting entries

“2014 Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction accepting entries

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the publication of To Kill A Mockingbird, and to honor former Alabama law student and author Harper Lee, The University of Alabama School of Law and the ABA Journal partnered together to create the Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction in 2010. The prize, authorized by Ms. Lee, is given annually to a book-length work of fiction ….” [Link to announcement.]

Lawyer Referrals for Jail and Prison Inmates in Oregon

Lawyer referrals in Oregon are made through the Oregon State Bar and, occasionally, from local or specialized bar associations and nonprofits. (The Oregon State Bar has a public website where you can check to make sure the lawyer is licensed to practice law in Oregon.)

Requests for a referral from the Oregon State Bar are made through email or telephone.

But what happens if you are in jail or prison? Here’s the information we got from the OSB Referral Service:

“… inmates can’t always get through. They can’t call 800 numbers at all and the 503 number requires the caller to navigate through a bunch of “press 1 if you want…” “press 63 if you need”, which doesn’t work with the prison system phone service.

The OSB Referral Service also said that “they receive a good number of written requests from inmates looking for referrals. And, they respond to them in writing. For outlying penitentiaries, [they] acknowledged that the OSB Service is slim on attorneys to refer, but that a “city-lawyer” would typically take these cases and be willing to travel to visit the inmate (if they had money to pay for representation).”