Articles Tagged with art and law

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Judges, public interest lawyers, and law librarians have a special interest in this European equivalent to a First Amendment battle. We stand up every day for people who want their voices to be heard and their human rights respected.

This growing cartoon collection is one of the most moving images so far from January 7th:

Paris shooting: Cartoonists show Charlie Hebdo solidarity”

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These Christmas Book Trees (and other holiday book-based decorations) images were compiled by a law librarian at the Jameson Law Library, University of Montana Law School in Missoula:

Oh Christmas Tree …. this is the time of year when ordinary stacks of books turn in to book trees in libraries everywhere….”

You can find Menorahs that have been made from books: e.g. run this search in Google Images: menorahs made from books

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iLibrarian post: A Guide to Little-Known Image Collections with Millions of Free, Hi-Res Images

…. There have been several new image collections that have opened up to the public just within the past year that not many people are aware of yet, but they offer access to thousands, or in some cases millions of outstanding photographs that can be downloaded for free….” [Link to full post.]

This is quite a treasure trove. Use of images will vary. For example:

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We’ve had many patrons ask questions about copyright, including an interesting one about getting permission to sell or make reproductions of an original oil painting. If you own an original work of art and are looking for resources on reproducing the artwork for profit and/or obtaining authorization to resell the artwork, including finding the applicable forms, there are a few resources you can try (including our new legal research guide on copyright law).

Permission and copyright in regards to artistic works can be a bit more complex than other forms of copyright. Nolo press publishes a number of excellent copyright-related titles that provide an overview of the issue including: Getting Permission: How to License & Clear Copyrighted Materials Online & Off; Patent, Copyright & Trademark; and The Craft Artist’s Legal Guide (check at your local public library to see if they carry the above-mentioned titles).

Works of visual art are covered by copyright. However, certain kinds of works of visual art (particularly limited editions) are also protected under the attribution and integrity aspects of the Visual Rights Act (VARA), 17 United States Code, Section 106A . Circular 40 from the US Copyright Office covers copyright registration for works of visual art. The Artists Rights Society also covers other rights assigned to artwork creators, including resale rights and moral rights. The Craft Artist’s Legal Guide has a section on what rights a customer has when they buy a work of art.  Nolo has an online article that covers the basics of assignments and licensing.

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Not to be confused with Scams and Swindles, parodies, hoaxes, and April Fool jokes play a somewhat different role in history. (See, e.g. “The best historical pranks and hoaxes,” from The Independent (01 April 2010))

I ran across the following legal commentary at Justia’s Verdict website:

“Digital Parody and the Shell Arctic Hoax: Did the Yes Men Cross A Legal Line With Their Most Recent Brandalism?” by Anita Ramasastry:

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Can Someone Use My Picture Without My Permission?

Public law librarians hear this question quite frequently and while we don’t really want to make our responses more complicated than is necessary, sometimes questions like these can be about as difficult to answer as you can imagine, especially in the abstract (such as on a blog rather than with a live person in the law library or on the telephone).

In part this is because, as with most questions in life and law, answers depend on context and specific facts unique to the person asking the question.

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I was looking at the Dykema law firm’s website and saw that they posted (with permission) this interesting article on the IACA:

Little Known Statute Can Create Staggering Liability.”

(You can also link to it from the Dykema Publications webpage, but however you read it (and other articles), please, please respect and observe copyright laws before copying, which you can do only with permission unless otherwise noted. In a nutshell, the more respect for copyright law, the more free content. The more abuse … say goodbye to free content.)