Articles Tagged with Baseball

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Calling all Poets (from the OSB Legal Pubs blog)

But if you’re going to write haiku, please, please, please do it right. (Sigh.) Haiku isn’t what you wrote in 5th grade (or even for your first love or your first legal newsletter submission, no matter how much you were patted on the head for your, um, creativity.) Haiku is creative writing, but there are Rules, just like brief writing. (Sorry.)

My favorite for beginners “how to write haiku” book is this one by David Coomler, but there are others (including websites) and don’t forget Senryu, which can be described as Japanese satirical poems. (Senryu can be very, very funny or simply a gurgle of amusement.)

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Constitution Day 2010 has passed with nary a whimper, but thoughts of the inimitable Classroom Law Project stay front and center.

Did you know you can volunteer with the Classroom Law Project? They are super-friendly, fun, and oh so smart. And they are willing to pass all that goodness on to you, free of charge. You just need to volunteer. (I’m volunteering so I can learn how to bring all that goodness out to my law library’s county.)

Learn and teach about civics, courts, and law making. You don’t need to be a lawyer to volunteer – really!

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Just in time to help us solve the Oregon sentencing and the Portland/Beaverton baseball stadium disputes:

It’s a new month (October!) and the funniest judge in the country is still on the bench and online:

“Judge-Mental: Beds is considering a career in virtual reality”

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We have haiku and we have six-word stories – and we have Baseball in under 150 Words (and don’t forget Rafe Esquith’s beautiful 132-word description), so why should we all be wailing about 140 character Tweets? (And, here (from Future Lawyer) is one reason to know how to Twitter. No one is forcing you, but it might be a very good thing to know, not unlike knowing how to drive a car with a manual transmission.)

I’m wondering, though … can I respond to a legal research question in fewer than 141 characters – and have the question answered satisfactorily, if incompletely?

It does depend on the question and on the glibness of the response too, I suppose. The classic example is the response to the Question: How Does One Get to Carnegie Hall? Answer: Practice, practice, practice. (Elephant jokes also have wonderfully pithy responses.)

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On my evening commute, while reading “Teach Like Your Hair’s On Fire” by Rafe Esquith, another part of my brain was trying to piece together a germ of an idea I have for this year’s Constitution Day…. I then read this in Rafe Esquith’s book:

“To me, baseball is the perfect game. It’s the only game in which the defense holds the ball. It’s the fairest of all sports: One team cannot use the clock to prevent the other team from catching up, and even when you are winning, you have to give your opponent a chance to even the score. With its lineup and batting order, baseball is more democratic than other sports: Each player gets a turn, and a team can’t keep feeding the ball to its best players. It is a game that has moments of stillness and sudden flashes of speed. To a causal observer, not much appears to be happening during a game. But a knowledgeable fan understands the game’s intricate nuances, from the positioning of the defense to the batter’s count.” (“Teach Like Your Hair’s On Fire” by Rafe Esquith, Viking Penguin, 2007, page 126. See also the Hobart Shakespeareans.)

If that’s not the 4th, 5th, and 6th Amendments rolled into a description of a beautiful and (mostly) honorable game, I don’t know what is. Maybe we should have a Constitution Team play baseball on Constitution Day ….hmmmm.

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Who said the law wasn’t fun? See the Fair Use Blog.

Excerpt from one post: Fantasy Baseball 2, Real Baseball Zero:

By Michael Kahn

The Eighth Circuit handed down its much awaited fantasy baseball decision in
CBC Distribution & Marketing, Inc. v. Major League Baseball Advanced Media, L.P., the appeal of the district court’s summary judgment in favor of CBC. CBC had brought a declaratory judgment case in St. Louis to establish its right to use — without license or compensation — the names and statistical information of real major league baseball players in its fantasy baseball products. The players had counterclaimed, maintaining that CBC’s fantasy baseball products violated their rights of publicity.”