Educating Homeless Children: Legal Requirements (ABA Report)

Gallagher Blogs, July 2, 2014, post: Educating Homeless Kids:

“Nearly a quarter of homeless people are children.* Over a million children were homeless at the start of the 2010-2011 school year. And being homeless can make it tough to get an education. To address some of the problems, the McKinney- Vento Homeless Assistance Act (1987) set up the Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program.

The ABA Commission on Homelessness and Poverty just published “Educating Children Without Housing: A Primer on Legal Requirements and Implementation Strategies for Educators, Advocates and Policymakers” …. [Link to full Gallagher Blogs post.]

That direct link to the book at the ABA Store works now, but if it ceases to work, visit the ABA Store and look for this title: “Educating Children Without Housing: A Primer on Legal Requirements and Implementation Strategies for Educators, Advocates and Policymakers,” 4th Edition, 2014.

Summer Reading: Law and Non-law Fiction for Attorneys

The Oregon State Bar’s Ian Pisarcik, Legal Publications Attorney Editor, gives us a list of intriguing books for our reading pleasure:

As an attorney, two things are reasonably certain to occur in your lifetime: Sallie Mae will deduct an astronomically high student loan payment from your checking account and someone, somewhere will ask you if you’ve read To Kill a Mockingbird and if you were aware that John Grisham used to be a real honest-to-God practicing attorney. It is at this point that you will calmly try to explain that you read more than just legal thrillers...” Link to Ian’s blog post and current list of recommendations.

Death by Failure to Research: Could You Pass a Legal Research Competency Test?

David Lankes tells a familiar “Death by Failure to Research” story in his free eBook, “Expect More: Demanding Better Libraries for Today’s Complex World:

…. In 2001 Ellen Roche, a 24-year-old lab technician, entered into a clinical trial at Johns Hopkins University’s Asthma and Allergy Center. The trial was investigating how the lungs responded to chemical irritants. Researchers had Roche inhale hexamethonium. Roche was the third volunteer to do so in the study. The first volunteer had developed a slight cough that lasted a week. The second volunteer had shown no adverse reactions. Roche developed a slight cough that got worse and worse. Five days after inhaling the chemical, Roche was admitted to intensive care. Less than a month later, she was dead. What makes this story all the more tragic is that Roche’s death could have been avoided. As part of the funded clinical trial, the researcher did a literature search. He searched a database that indexed studies from 1960 to the present day. He found nothing on hexamethonium. However, had he not restricted himself to the Internet-accessible version of the database he would have found studies from the 1950’s linking hexamethonium to significant lung problems. Because of Roche’s death, all drug studies at Hopkins must now include a consultation with a librarian and pharmacist….” [Lankes, p. 80 [PDF p. 87] Link to free online versions of David Lankes’ latest book: “Expect More: Demanding Better Libraries for Today’s Complex World.”  The digital version of this book is free to download and distribute. It is in PDF, EPUB, MOBI, and iBook formats.]

Read more about “Principles and Standards for Legal Research Competency.”

 

OSB Publication Wins National Award: “Oregon Constitutional Law”

The Association for Continuing Legal Education (ACLEA) has selectedOregon Constitutional Law” as the winner of its ACLEA’s Best Award of Outstanding Achievement in Publications.

Oregon was a pioneer of the movement to interpret state constitutions independently of the U.S. Constitution. Not only does the Oregon Constitution address many of the rights protected by the federal Constitution, but it also defines many of the powers that the federal Constitution reserved for the states. Attorneys practicing in Oregon should be familiar with the provisions of the Oregon Constitution and the appellate courts’ interpretations of those provisions…” [Read the full post.]

Help pick the winner of the 2014 Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction

And add these books to your reading list!

ABA Journal News: Help pick the winner of the 2014 Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction, by Allen Pusey

Excerpt: “The three finalists for the 2014 Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction have been announced by the ABA Journal and the University of Alabama Law School, co-sponsors of the Harper Lee Prize. They are: Ronald H. Balson for Once We Were Brothers; John Grisham for Sycamore Row; and Elizabeth Strout for The Burgess Boys.

You can help choose the winner by voting for your favorite in the poll accompanying this post. Voting is open through June 30, and the winner will be honored on August 28 at the Library of Congress ….” [Link to article.]

We the People Book Club (Classroom Law Project)

Even if we don’t join all those book clubs dangled so temptingly (ahem) in front of us, we can still add their books to our personal reading lists.

But if you are inclined to join a Lucky Lab CLP book group meet-up and if you’re a bit of a law and governement wonk, here’s a book club for you:

We the People Book Club, which meets at the Lucky Lab, will be reading the following books:

“It can be hard to keep up with all the great books about American government and democracy. Back by popular demand is a a book club where we will explore great books — loosely related to the Units in the WTP text — with great friends over a pretty good dinner. Leading book club discussions is the always insightful Susie Marcus and with her Shelley Larkins, the winning, inquisitive and fun attorney coach from Grant HS’s Con Team.

•Tuesday, Dec. 3 Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham
•Tuesday, Feb. 25 Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Life Among the Lowly by Harriet Beecher Stowe
•Tuesday, Apr. 29 Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy by Gary May
•Tuesday, May 27 Peyote vs. the State: Religious Freedom on Trial by Garrett Epps
•Tuesday, Jun. 17 My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor…” [Read the blog post and visit the CLP homepage.]

2014 Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction accepting entries

“2014 Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction accepting entries

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the publication of To Kill A Mockingbird, and to honor former Alabama law student and author Harper Lee, The University of Alabama School of Law and the ABA Journal partnered together to create the Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction in 2010. The prize, authorized by Ms. Lee, is given annually to a book-length work of fiction ….” [Link to announcement.]

King Lear Goes to Law School: Estate Planning, Distribution of Wealth, and the Art of Teaching

It’s definitely the Year of King Lear, with ghostly sightings, new theatre productions, creative interpretations, and now:

King Lear in Law School (from the Gallagher Blog)

Maybe you can read the article along with  book “Someday All This Will Be Yours: A History of Inheritance and Old Age,” by Hendrik Hartog