Articles Tagged with Comics

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From the regulation of midwifery and home birth, to the history of genetic counseling, to the impact of federal Indian policies on Native communities, the history of birth reflects both cultural values and government power….”:

Special Issue: Regulating Birth,Oregon Historical Quarterly: The Journal of Record for Oregon History, Summer 2016, and:

“Special Bonus!

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Our beloved Unshelved team has come up with a T-shirt for the rockets scientists, and the clueless, in our lives: “Without Rockets, it’s Just Science.

Link back to the comic strip that spawned a T-shirt.

Very high cool factor!

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The ABA Journal alerts us to a new comic book heroine who is a lawyer in “real life.” Maybe the comic will be as funny as the article and the Comments:

LAW IN POPULAR CULTURE: Meet She-Hulk, heroine of new comic book series who can bench-press a bus and runs her own law firm,” Feb 11, 2014, by Martha Neil.

Can’t wait to see what the Portland Mercury will do with Hulk’s she-cousin.

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Is a cartoon library worth $10 million? You bet it is, if consider the history and the joy it contains.

The Cartoon Library at Ohio State University is a one place to start your cartoon preservation and collection research. Heaven knows archivists know about preservation of printed, and other, materials – and while heaven might look fondly upon archivists, it tests them mightily to see if they are worthy of persisting on such a quixotic journey. Talk about a dream job – a Cartoon Archivist.  As Mark Twain apocryphally advised writers: make ’em laugh and make ’em cry. That’s good cartooning (and librarianship) in a nutshell.

And possibly just worth the long journey to Columbus, Ohio:  Bill Watterson (Calvin & Hobbes) and Richard Thompson (Cul de Sac) will appear on the same stage in the Spring 2014 at Ohio State. Wowsers!

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Visit the National Center for State Courts (NCSC) Justice Case Files website to read this hilarious coloring-book story:

Justice Case File 4: The Case of the Broken Controller is a (PDF) narrative coloring book available to download for free. (Note: the PDF at the NCSC site is almost 8 MB. It can be optimized to under 4 MB if you have Adobe.)

The National Center for State Courts (NCSC) launched a public awareness campaign several years ago to educate the public about how the courts work. The central effort of this campaign was to develop a series of graphic novels, called Justice Case Files, which engage the reader while giving insight into how judges make decisions, how the courts protect the public, and why courts are so important to a democratic society….”

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Gale Cengage is running a contest: Are You a Librarian Superhero?

Your librarian can turn into a cartoon, which to some might not sound like such a good deal, but to many librarians, We Love It!

You can read the Contest Rules and the Press Release for more information.

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Sent to me by a favorite lawyer library-patron:

20 Heroic Librarians Who Save the World

There are also flesh and blood librarian heroes, some of whom you can read about in this book – and they are almost as much fun, and as ornery, as the comic books ones:

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I have survived jury duty and live to blog another day. I will post about jury duty in a couple of days (after I survive my TV appearance!). In the meantime, on to Peanuts and the Law which I read about during my jury service (waiting, waiting, and more waiting – can’t they speed it up a bit? But more on that later.)

In the February 2007 (free but registration required) LTN (Law Technology News), Robert Ambrogi of the excellent Law Sites (aka Legal Line) blog tells more of the story of his experience with his son’s peanut allergy (his previous posting on the subject is here), in an article entitled, “Just One Bite.” Peanut allergies are serious indeed, as anyone who knows anyone with one would agree.

The one-page LTN story is chock-full of sources of information on peanut allergies, some you probably know about and others less well known, including the U.S. FDA Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition, AllergicChild, Food Allergy Project, and many more.