Articles Tagged with court records

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Oregon Judicial Department Online Records Search: Free, Public Access:

The Oregon Judicial Department is pleased to provide free online access to limited case information in the circuit courts and Tax Court of this state. The displayed information is not the official ORS 7.020 register record, and, therefore, should not be relied upon as an official record of the court. Specifically, individuals should not use this system for background checks or other purposes that require more complete identity or case information. The full official register for non-confidential case types can be accessed at the courthouse public terminals or, for certain business entities, through a subscription to OJCIN Online.” [Link to portal.]

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This is an update to the previous 10/14 blog post: OJIN and OECI Access in Oregon County Law Libraries

The following Oregon public law libraries have in-library public, or staff-assisted, access to OJIN, OECI, or ACMS (court dockets). (But, these locations do not necessarily have access to any or all full-text filed documents. You may need visit Circuit Court records offices for those documents.)

Contact information for all Oregon county law libraries can be found at the OCCLL directory.

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OJD’s Oregon eCourt Implementation News website will keep you posted on where and when eCourt is going live and on related news stories. It’s fun watching it grow and spread, not like a virus but like an oasis in a desert. Water, we need water! Data, we need online data!

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Jim Calloway, at the Oklahoma State Bar, alerts us to these “Ten Improved Fastcase Tools,” including this intriguing one (among others):

PACER Searching

Searching federal dockets with PACER is slow and difficult, especially if you have to search multiple courts. So Fastcase has worked with Justia to build a tool that can search across all PACER sites at once. It’s the depth of PACER with the power of Fastcase. You can also filter by state, court, date or type of suit. When you select a document you’d like to download, the tool takes you to the individual PACER site, where standard charges apply.” [Link to Jim Calloway’s blog post.]

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We’ve been receiving numerous calls lately from people wanting copies of their divorce records.  The first step is knowing which county would have the records (where did the divorce occur?).  From there, you need to contact the applicable circuit court.  The Oregon Judicial Department (OJD) provides links to each circuit court (left-hand side of the page in a drop-down list under “Circuit Court Websites”).  OJD also provides these instructions for finding copies of court records or information on court cases.  Note, your court records may be in the court’s archives or another off-site location, affecting the amount of time the request will take.  Some courts handle record requests both in person and by mail.  See the Washington County Circuit Court Records Department webpage for information on obtaining Washington County court records (the page also provides information on the difference between copies, certified copies, and exemplified copies). You can find more information on divorce and family law matters in Washington County at the law library’s divorce/family law page.

If you are looking for information on finding copies of Oregon marriage licenses, see Laura’s blog post from June 2009.  The law library’s divorce/family law page also has information on filing and finding vital records.

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Do you want to do a “background check” on an employer (individual or corporation), a future or current partner, an employee, a “friend,” or a colleague?
FIRST and FOREMOST: Keep your expectations realistic.  If you expect to find all the data you are seeking in one place, one database, one website, or one-anything, you are gravely mistaken.
We just got a copy of “Wanted! U.S. Cirminal Records: Sources & Research Methodology,” by Ron Arons.  (There are other books on researching public records, too.  They will cure you of any illusion that searching public (and private) records is for the faint-hearted.)