Articles Tagged with Database licensing

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People like “free.’ People like getting free content from other people who paid for the content. Long live the free-loader, long live the person who spends $20 in time and gas looking for a free parking spot instead of paying $10 for a paid space! It’s the principle, isn’t it?

But sometimes getting “free” is about the journey and the satisfaction earned when putting one’s search skills to the test. Here’s one way to do both, from Aaron at Musings about Librarianship:

5 services to help researchers find free full text instantly & a quick assessment of effectiveness

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When you need legal research advice, turn to the legal research experts, professional law librarians, most of whom are able to share their expertise freely, or low-costly (so to speak), which is good value indeed when you need accurate, timely, and comprehensive information.

Great law librarians keep up with the vast world of legal research resources: dozens, hundreds, and even thousands of journals and websites and lawyer and law librarian listserves, networks, and professional associations (e.g. AALL). A Law Librarian’s Continuing Education also includes reading local, state, and national judicial, legislative, and regulatory news, and related news in the foreign and international legal world.

So, make sure the librarian you consult for legal research advice is Keeping Up With the Legal Research Joneses or, more to the point, Keeping Up With Opposing Counsel, whose access to legal research resources might be funded a whole lot better than yours:

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“It Takes More Than a Dumpster to Build A Digital Law Library: 12 Critical Components For Digital Law Library Transformation.” from Dewey B Strategic,
12/10/14

“.… For the past two decades law librarians and legal information professionals have been assessing products and developing in house solutions to support virtual library resources. We have been sharing best practices and advising legal publishers on how to build the next generation of products that lawyers will be willing to use ….” [Link to full blog post.]

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Library (and law firm) database (and eBook) licensing can be tricky, to put it mildly.

There are hundreds, thousands even, of fee-based subscription databases used by lawyers, legal researchers, librarians, historians, etc.  If you need to negotiate and manage a database contract, here is a useful primer, and much more:

The American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) has posted the following Code of Best Practices for Licensing Electronic Resources guidelines on its website, with easy access for everyone, not just AALL members: