Articles Tagged with Digital books

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Your digital photos, letters, books, articles, documents, messages, etc. have no existence unless you pay attention to their preservation – or without electricity, for that matter. (You can’t really hold Zeros and Ones, Nothingness if you will, in your hands, let alone bequeath Nothingness to your heirs without taking serious steps to preserve and authenticate the data.)

See, e.g. from Moritz Law Library at The Ohio State University for what PURLs are:

Research Tip: What is “Permanent” Online?

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Your eBook (and its publisher) knows what pages you skipped, it knows what you write in the margins, it keeps track of when you read and when you shop … it knows all about you. It gets worse:

Pew Research Internet Project: The Future of Privacy: Digital Life in 2025: “George Orwell may have been an optimist”

‘”…. This report is a look into the future of privacy in light of the technological change, ever-growing monetization of digital encounters, and shifting relationship of citizens and their governments that is likely to extend through the next decade. “We are at a crossroads,” noted Vytautas Butrimas, the chief adviser to a major government’s ministry. He added a quip from a colleague who has watched the rise of surveillance in all forms, who proclaimed, “George Orwell may have been an optimist,” in imagining “Big Brother.”’ [page 5]

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Rent a Law Book? Want to get App App Appy?

Read: “Legal Research Revolutionized,” by Dan Giancaterino, in GP Solo, Vol. 31 No. 3:

“…. Law libraries will survive, and even thrive, in the future. An article in the May 2013 issue of ABA Journal estimated that only 15 percent of the unique volumes in U.S. law libraries have been digitized….

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Public libraries have some of the best buyers’ guides for e-Reading devices. Check at your own public library or start with this one to find links to reviews, consumer tips, and more:

Washington County (Oregon) Cooperative Library Services (WCCLS), “Choosing a table or e-reader” (and check out their Library2Go help pages – or visit your own public library’s eBook pages)

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This isn’t a complete list but these are good places to start your search for full-text digital books – but don’t forget your local libraries and librarians.

First, sometimes you need good bibliographic info (e.g. correct spelling of author name, exact title, etc.) before you begin your search for the full-text.  Worldcat dot org is a good catalog to find that info.  Your own Oregon public library may have a full-service subscription version you can use.

Second: General web search engines will index the contents of many of these repositories, but not all content.

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The Library Law blog (not to be confused with the Law Librarian Blog 🙂 takes comments on this question (see full post and comments here):

“I wonder if you can help me locate information on the following scenario. I borrow a book from a library (public or school) which was published before 1923 and is therefore in the public domain. I would like to make a digital image copy of this book both for my own use and to distribute freely to others.

Assuming there’s no license or other relevant & explicit limitation on borrowers’ use of library materials, is it necessary to obtain permission from the library before doing this? Is it common for libraries to create such limitations regarding public domain works?”