Articles Tagged with eBooks

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Your eBook (and its publisher) knows what pages you skipped, it knows what you write in the margins, it keeps track of when you read and when you shop … it knows all about you. It gets worse:

Pew Research Internet Project: The Future of Privacy: Digital Life in 2025: “George Orwell may have been an optimist”

‘”…. This report is a look into the future of privacy in light of the technological change, ever-growing monetization of digital encounters, and shifting relationship of citizens and their governments that is likely to extend through the next decade. “We are at a crossroads,” noted Vytautas Butrimas, the chief adviser to a major government’s ministry. He added a quip from a colleague who has watched the rise of surveillance in all forms, who proclaimed, “George Orwell may have been an optimist,” in imagining “Big Brother.”’ [page 5]

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“It Takes More Than a Dumpster to Build A Digital Law Library: 12 Critical Components For Digital Law Library Transformation.” from Dewey B Strategic,
12/10/14

“.… For the past two decades law librarians and legal information professionals have been assessing products and developing in house solutions to support virtual library resources. We have been sharing best practices and advising legal publishers on how to build the next generation of products that lawyers will be willing to use ….” [Link to full blog post.]

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You are willing to read books like this one! “The LCSH Century: One Hundred Years with the Library of Congress Subject Headings System.” [This is a link to a free download of the book. Librarians are founding members of the “sharing economy.” We educate, inform, and entertain.]

Or, support your local book-buying economy and get a bound copy suitable for gift-giving:

Stone, Alva T, ed. “The LCSH Century: One Hundred Years with the Library of Congress Subject Headings System.” New York: Routledge, 2013. 025.49 LCSH ISBN 978-0789011695

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Rent a Law Book? Want to get App App Appy?

Read: “Legal Research Revolutionized,” by Dan Giancaterino, in GP Solo, Vol. 31 No. 3:

“…. Law libraries will survive, and even thrive, in the future. An article in the May 2013 issue of ABA Journal estimated that only 15 percent of the unique volumes in U.S. law libraries have been digitized….

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Oregon State Bar: Promoting Access to Justice with E-Books

The OSB Legal Publications department launched a new project in May that we wanted to tell you about. We have begun offering a series of Family Law e-books on Amazon.com. These e-books include information on how to find and hire a lawyer, as well as links to information about the OSB Lawyer Referral Service, legal aid services in Oregon, and the ABA page on lawyer referral services nationwide….” [Link to full 6/27/14 blogpost.]

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Public libraries have some of the best buyers’ guides for e-Reading devices. Check at your own public library or start with this one to find links to reviews, consumer tips, and more:

Washington County (Oregon) Cooperative Library Services (WCCLS), “Choosing a table or e-reader” (and check out their Library2Go help pages – or visit your own public library’s eBook pages)

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Buying that eBook from Amazon is Easy. Downloading that eBook from your public library is Easy. What is Not Easy is being on the other side and managing  eBook programs.

Negotiating and managing eBook licenses, testing software, reviewing RFPs, troubleshooting eBook services for users, finding an eBook vendor for the books your patrons or customers want, etc., etc., etc.  can be a full-time job.

See NSR, “68 essential resources for eBooks in libraries,” by [law librarian] Ellyssa Kroski, to learn a little about what you need to know to be a good eBook program manager.

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In the race to eBook-nirvana, should lawyers and judges stop long enough to read the privacy fine print in their eBook contracts?  (You can be sure law librarians are reading it.)

We all know (at least I hope you all do) that publishers and digital distributors collect data on how you use your eBook. They know what you read, how fast, if you read the end before you read the beginning – well, maybe not the latter. But they could track that if they wanted to and come up with a profile of people who do just that (ahem).

Don’t forget that Wall Street Journal article, July 19, 2012, Your E-Book is Reading You,” by Alexandra Alter, about data collected on the average eBook reader.