Articles Tagged with Internet Archive

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End of Term Archive: US Federal Web Domain at Presidential Transitions (Today’s Internet Archive link.)

Other sources of Obama Presidency digital archives can be found at the Obama Whitehouse Archives website. (Today’s Internet Archive link.)

Research Tip: Additional official and unofficial digital archived webpages and other sources of presidential documents exist or will soon come into existence. Check the usual suspects: Presidential libraries, Library of Congress, National Archives, branch of government archives (e.g. Judiciary, Congress, Executive), the Internet Archive, HathiTrust, university libraries and archives, nonprofit legal and government information databases, fee-based legal and government information databases, and librarians everywhere.

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The Internet Archive is partnering with the Council of State Archivists (CoSA) and Society of American Archivists (SAA) at the:

Archive-It’s 2016 Partner Meeting, Tuesday, August 2, 2016, in Atlanta, Georgia

Previous OLR blog post about the Internet Archive.

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Two recent articles worth reading if you want to research online and recall the past:

Net for Lawyers: Google’s News Search is in Even Worse Condition Than we First Thought, Another in an Unfortunately Growing Series of Articles about Google Search Problems

“The Cobweb: Can the Internet be archived? by Jill Lepore, New Yorker, Jan. 26, 2015 issue.

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From ABA News: “Site aiming to prevent ‘link rot’ for legal researchers wins 2015 Webby,” by Molly McDonough, 4/27/15:

Excerpt: “A service that enables courts and researchers to make permanent links to research found on the Web has won a Webby Award for best legal site of 2015.

Perma.cc, developed by the Harvard Law School Library and supported by a network of more than 60 law libraries, takes on the widespread problem of broken or defunct Web links, also known as “link rot,” which can that can undermine research by scholars and courts….” [Link to full ABA article.]

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It’s easy! Visit the Internet Archive. Click on Web. Enter the URL you want saved into the “Save Page Now” box. Voila!

For example, I linked in a previous blog post to this article: “Never trust a corporation to do a library’s job.”

But, let’s say, the article vanishes in the fullness of time from that particular URL and you can’t find another URL location for it via Google. You will still be able to see the article at the Internet Archive since I used theirSave Page Now” service.