Articles Tagged with Legal aid

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The Self-Represented Litigation Network (SRLN) is an organization for Access-to-Justice (A2J) professionals, lawyers, judges, law librarians, law professors, law students, and others who believe that everyone has a right to free or affordable legal assistance and access to courts.

The “2017 SRLN Conference will be held February 23 -24, 2017 at the California Judicial Council building in San Francisco.

The Self-Represented Litigation Network (SRLN) is “establishing a permanent Conferences Committee as part of the Strategy and Outreach Working Group….” Locate SRLN members where you work to find out how you can contribute.

 

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Oregon Access to Justice Forum, September 2016:

The Multnomah Bar Association (MBA) has this event on its calendar and you can link to more information and registration from the Oregon Campaign for Equal Justice website and this event’s Registration site.

Access to Justice Forum/Advisory Committee Meeting

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The Equal Justice Library is now located at the Georgetown Law School Library:

The National Equal Justice Library (NEJL) is the first and only institution dedicated to documenting and preserving the legal profession’s history of providing counsel for those unable to afford it….” [Link to National Equal Justice Library homepage.]

Their collection includes oral histories, like this one about the early history of the Legal Services Corporation in Arkansas:

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“Thinking About Designing Courthouses for Access to Justice,” posted on January 17, 2016

by Richard Zorza.

Courthouse construction is on the minds of all Oregonians. As long as the project managers, judges, courthouse employees, and other courthouse occupants and visitors don’t let the architects go all “let’s get an architecture prize!” on them, then taxpayers, judges, lawyers, and litigants may have a chance at getting the courthouses we need and want.

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We try to update this Oregon Legal Assistance Resource Guide at least twice a year (you can also find the guide from the WCLL Legal Research Resources website), but additions, corrections, and suggestions are always welcome. You can “Leave a reply” to this blog post or you can “Contact Us” via email.

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Read this interesting blog post and discussion (in the Comments).

Future Fridays: Hey, ABA – Why Do Solos and Smalls Bear the Burden of Access to Justice? By Carolyn Elefant, at MyShingle, November 7, 2014.

And this one:

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“Markowitz Herbold PC presents the Ninth Annual Taste for Justice benefiting St Andrew Legal Clinic, Thursday, October 30, 2014.

Join fellow lawyers and supporters for a lively evening celebrating the “taste” of fine vintage wines, craft beers, spirits from local distilleries and exceptional cuisine – all while raising funds to support the important work of St. Andrew Legal Clinic. Don’t miss this special evening.

Reserve your tickets at 503.281.1500 x 324 or online at Taste for Justice dot org.”

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Project Nanny Van: a legal service design

“Project Nanny Van is an excellent new example of creative legal service design…this mobile van that [goes] to locations where nannies might be congregating, and provides them with resources about their legal rights — as well as other resources to empower them.

See more Open Law Lab ideas.

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“Change afoot in American civil justice system,” Jul 22, 2014, by Rebecca Love Kourlis (former justice of the Colorado Supreme Court).

Excerpt:

“…. Due process in the American civil justice system is like sweet green grass: It is essential to our lifeblood, but too much can be deadly. Beginning in 2008, the profession began to sound the alarm that the civil justice system was indeed in danger of foundering. The ABA Section of Litigation was part of that chorus. More than 3,000 members of the section participated in a survey (PDF), which found that:

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We have updated our Oregon Legal Assistance Resource Guide.

We have expanded its reach beyond the Portland-metro area so new resources have been added – and you are welcome to suggest additions.

Link to the PDF or link to it from our What’s New webpage.