Articles Tagged with Legal history

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Every legal researcher needs archived, historic or just plain out of print documents once in a while.

Oregon has you covered. If you’re a crypto or an avowed historian, writer, or any other type of bibliographic spelunker, check out the Oregon Archives Crawl this October 8, 2016:

2016 Oregon Archives Crawl

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From the regulation of midwifery and home birth, to the history of genetic counseling, to the impact of federal Indian policies on Native communities, the history of birth reflects both cultural values and government power….”:

Special Issue: Regulating Birth,Oregon Historical Quarterly: The Journal of Record for Oregon History, Summer 2016, and:

“Special Bonus!

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If your latest novel, or dinner table conversation, includes a duel, here’s a useful and humorous blog post for you from In Custodia Legis, a Law Librarians of Congress blog:

“So, you’ve been challenged to a duel. What are the rules?,” June 2, 2016 by Robert Brammer.

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The Equal Justice Library is now located at the Georgetown Law School Library:

The National Equal Justice Library (NEJL) is the first and only institution dedicated to documenting and preserving the legal profession’s history of providing counsel for those unable to afford it….” [Link to National Equal Justice Library homepage.]

Their collection includes oral histories, like this one about the early history of the Legal Services Corporation in Arkansas:

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You need to do a little research if you want to sound as if you know what you are talking about, or, as a comedian (more than once) said:

The lesson of that first day in kindergarten was re-taught to me throughout my life: If you think you’re pretty smart, you’re not talking to enough people.” Cameron, Bruce, “The Smartest Guy in an Empty Room,” Funny Times, September 2013, p. 3.

Onward to the All Writs Act:

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If you think you live in the most interesting of times, you are not reading enough history – or not reading the right wild and crazy stories that make reading history so absorbing and enlightening. The Library of Congress has marvelous history in small bites blog posts, like this one:

“Love, Adultery, and Madness,” February 13, 2015 by Robert Brammer, Law Library of Congress

Excerpt: “It is often said that love can drive you mad. As further evidence, take the 19th Century case that is said to have introduced the defense of temporary insanity in American jurisprudence. This case resulted from an affair between the wife of a member of Congress and one of Francis Scott Key’s sons….” [Link to full blog post.]

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Hat tip to Yale Law Library blog post: “Blackstone Goes Hollywood” – and we’re the studio,” June 5, by Mike Widener

Excerpt from Worlds of Law Blackstone Goes Hollywood post:

I’ve made a new video—about Blackstone’s Commentaries. It’s also about storytelling form in legal history. My sister-in-law once named a fish Blackstone, which I thought was a very nice sign of respect to the great eighteenth-century explicator of the common law, but the fish plays no part in this video. But Humphrey Bogart does. And so does Orson Welles….” [Link to full blog post and video.]