Articles Tagged with Legal research resources

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“State Legal Information Census: An Analysis of Primary State Legal Information,” by Sarah Glassmeyer, Published on February 21, 2016.

Sarah Glassmeyer, is a Research Fellow with the Harvard Library Innovation Lab, Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

Excerpt: “.… Findings indicate that there exist at least 14 barriers to accessing legal information. These barriers exist for both the individual user of a resource for personal research as well as an institutional user that would seek to republish or transform the information. Details about the types of barriers and the quantity of their existence can be found under “Barriers to Access.” At the time of the census, no state provided barrier-free access to their legal information….” [Link to full LLRX article.]

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When you need legal research advice, turn to the legal research experts, professional law librarians, most of whom are able to share their expertise freely, or low-costly (so to speak), which is good value indeed when you need accurate, timely, and comprehensive information.

Great law librarians keep up with the vast world of legal research resources: dozens, hundreds, and even thousands of journals and websites and lawyer and law librarian listserves, networks, and professional associations (e.g. AALL). A Law Librarian’s Continuing Education also includes reading local, state, and national judicial, legislative, and regulatory news, and related news in the foreign and international legal world.

So, make sure the librarian you consult for legal research advice is Keeping Up With the Legal Research Joneses or, more to the point, Keeping Up With Opposing Counsel, whose access to legal research resources might be funded a whole lot better than yours:

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Just because landlord-tenant law is state-specific and local law for most of us mere mortals doesn’t mean there aren’t some excellent treatises and resources on the subject for those times we need to read about multi-state landlord-tenant practices and policies. If that is where your research is taking you, mosey over to the LLLoC blog post:

Landlord-Tenant Law: A Beginner’s Guide

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If you find a “law” on The Internet, doesn’t it mean it’s “The Law?” (hahaha)?

Not everything you read on the Internet is accurate. (I know! Hard to believe, but it’s true!)

Make sure the “law” you find online is accurate and know how to correct and update it if necessary.

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Law offices without law librarians can also save time and money with the tips and reviews in the 2013 Legal Information Buyer’s Guide & Reference Manual.

1) How to deter and refuse unsolicited shipments: Do you know about 39 U.S. Code 3009?

2) Do you really need annual print supplements? (They can be expensive up-front and to file/shelve.)

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I recently posted about the King County (Washington State) debt collection research guides and woefully neglected to link my readers to the excellent OREGON debt collection legal research guides at the Lane County Law Library. Use their Research Guide Index to find Debt Collection and many other useful guides.