Articles Tagged with Legislative intent

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Thinking beyond the Uniform Law Commission, the American Law Institute, and the American Bar Association:  Who Makes Model Laws?

You’ve heard of the Uniform Commercial Code and the Model Penal Code, but how much do you know about model laws? You could learn more by reading this short article: Mary Whisner, There Oughta Be a Law—a Model Law, 106 Law Libr. J. 125 (2014)….”  [Link to blog post.]

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What happens in Oregon when a word in a statute is undefined – and someone’s life and liberty is at stake?

In the case of 2011 ORS 167.007 and Oregon v. Palomo, the Oregon Court of Appeals weighs in and defines the word “fee,” with a little help from a dictionary and a legislative history.

Oregon v. Palomo A148047 (Control), A148045

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The next time someone says, “It’s not your grandma’s world, anymore,” you might want to respond, “what a pity, my grandma was a smart cookie.”
The 9/8/11, blog post at Legal Research Plus, “How to Use Legislative History to Teach Grammar,” cites and links to Prof. Susan J. Hankin’s “Statutory Interpretation in the Age of Grammatical Permissiveness:  An Object Lesson for Teaching Why Grammar Matters