Articles Tagged with Marijuana laws

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When Oregon Laws are codified*, they can be scattered all over their corresponding legislative subject compilation, the Oregon Revised Statutes, so, unless you are a researcher with too much time on your hands, I recommend you start with one of the following resources until you become very familiar with all the new cannabis laws, statutes AND regulations – and there will be new cannabis laws until you die or until the world’s lights go out, whichever comes first:

1) Oregon Revised Statutes (ORS): the 2015 ORS, which has not yet been posted online, will be the first ORS with codified recreational cannabis statutes. Toss the word “cannabis” into the ORS search box. You might want to toss in the word “marijuana” just to make sure you didn’t miss anything.

2) Laws & Regs from OHA: Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP), which links to their OMMP Administrative Rules, Statutes and Legal Information webpage.

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For the record, Measure 91 does not mention the word “recreation(al)” and its official “this Act shall be known as” statement says: “Control, Regulation, and Taxation of Marijuana and Industrial Hemp Act.”

Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP), at the Public Health Authority website.

2014 Measure 91: Recreational Marijuana, at the Oregon OLCC website.

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On Thursday, May 1, 2014, The League of Oregon Cities is presenting a marijuana workshop for local governments:

9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. • DoubleTree by Hilton Portland (Lloyd Center)

• Learn what’s happening in Oregon related to medical marijuana

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“The Oregon Cannabis Industry Association is hosting an informative seminar providing Oregon cannabis industry members, and those looking to enter the industry, with an opportunity to learn from professionals across the legal spectrum. Attorneys and professionals will cover basic business law, employment law, tax law and more. A representative from the Oregon Health Authority will be on hand to answer questions about the application process and rules for the upcoming state-licensed medical marijuana facilities.

Tickets are $150. (Approval for CLE credits pending for practicing Oregon attorneys.)….

Link to Oregon Cannabis Industry Association (OCIA) program webpage for more information.

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New marijuana laws in Washington and Colorado raise the bar for dog training: Here’s a blog post from the Gallagher Law Library (UW) blog:

Drug Dogs Going Back to School

The blog post also includes a reference to a recent Oregon Law Review article: “The current issue of the Oregon Law Review (available free in PDF) is a symposium on drug policy. It includes Jane Bambauer, Defending the Dog, 91 Or. L. Rev. 1203 (2013). The author says “This short essay makes the uneasy case for the narcotics dog….”

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New to the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program and not sure where to turn first?

To find information and dispensaries, you have a few choices, but start with your doctor or contact the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program. You can find all sorts of information in advertisements, but it’s always good to start with official sources first.

Disclaimer: The information provided on this blog is for research purposes only.  We do not provide legal advice, nor do we endorse any person, product, or company.

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Legislators don’t draft statutes, which should be a surprise to no one. (Have you ever tried to read your state or federal statutes?! Just as bad, try reading the Oregon Constitution in order to find an answer to a simple question.)

Drafting statutes is an art and a craft and we should be thankful that our state and federal legislators don’t do the actual drafting, although, it would be nice if they made sure the final statutes themselves made sense, not just listened to and voted on what was “intended.” But we are all human, or most of us are in any event, and there is a limit to how much we can fit into 24 hours.

Anyway, legislative staff members, lobbyists, and sometimes ordinary citizens draft or participate in the drafting of statutes, and it sometimes starts with op ed pieces proposing new legislation, like this:

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“… Today, the Oregon Supreme Court held that sheriffs must issue concealed handgun licenses to applicants who meet the statutory requirements for such issuance, regardless of the applicants’ use of medical marijuana. In doing so, the Court rejected arguments raised by sheriffs from two different counties that, to the extent that Oregon’s concealed handgun licensing statute does not concern itself with an applicant’s use of marijuana, it is preempted by a federal statute that prohibits possession of a firearm by any unlawful user of a controlled substance….”  [Link to OJD Media Releases.]
Link to full (consolidated) case:  WILLIS v. WINTERS (CC 07-2755-Z7; CA A139875; SC S058645), SANSONE v. GORDON, STEVEN SCHWERDT v. GORDON, LEE WALLICK v. GORDON, (CC C073809CV, C0073810CV, C073811CV; CA A139802; SC S058642)  [Link to full Oregon Supreme Court case.]
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A recent bill in the Oregon Legislature, 2009 HB 3274 (HTML or PDF), and a question from a patron, started me thinking about what my research strategy might look like if I had to draft legislation on this subject or if I had to argue for or against taxing marijuana sales (medical marijuana or other uses, if any).

(There was also this recent New York Times story: Struggling States Look to Unorthodox Taxes, by Jesse McKinley, February 28, 2009.)

And, I attended an interesting program recently on evidence-based research (origins in evidence-based medicine), which gave me even more ideas on sources one would need to consult to write the definitive guide to marijuana research, or even just marijuana taxation.