Articles Tagged with Privacy

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The October print 2016 Consumer Reports article (online is dated 9/20/16) cites to Ten Minute Mail and 65 other ways to protect your online privacy:

“66 Ways to Protect Your Privacy Right Now,” by Consumer Reports, September 20, 2016

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Do writers need their own “Taylor Swift” to protect their right to be paid for their labor? (See NPR’s story about Swift, Apple, and right to be paid.)

The latest Amazon plan to pay authors based on pages turned (and presumably read?), makes me wonder if all readers shouldn’t just start turning those pages, whether you read them or not. We can only hope that the Amazon eyes “watching” you turn pages aren’t also able to tell if you have actually read the words. (No, maybe we don’t want to know that.)

“What If Authors Were Paid Every Time Someone Turned a Page?” by Peter Wayner, The Atlantic, June 20, 2015

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Hat tip to the 5/11/15,Library Link of the Day:

Librarians Versus the NSA: Your local library is on the front lines against government surveillance,” by Zoë Carpenter May 6, 2015, The Nation, May 25, 2015

“…. Librarians have frequently been involved in the fight against government surveillance. The first librarian to be locked up for defending privacy and intellectual freedom was Zoia Horn, who spent three week in jail in 1972 for refusing to testify against anti–Vietnam War activists. During the Cold War, librarians exposed the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s attempts to recruit library staffers to spy on foreigners, particularly Soviets, through a national effort called the Library Awareness Program….” [Link to full Nation article.]

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U.S. Congress at Work:

18 U.S. Code § 2703:

(a) Contents of Wire or Electronic Communications in Electronic Storage.— A governmental entity may require the disclosure by a provider of electronic communication service of the contents of a wire or electronic communication, that is in electronic storage in an electronic communications system for one hundred and eighty days or less, only pursuant to a warrant issued using the procedures described in the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure (or, in the case of a State court, issued using State warrant procedures) by a court of competent jurisdiction….” [Link to the full text of 18 USC 2703 at the Cornell Legal Information website.]

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Oregon 2015 House Bill (HB) 2596: “Provides that person who records another person’s intimate areas commits crime of invasion of personal privacy.

(Note: See also HB 2356, which “Provides that person who records another person’s intimate areas commits crime of invasion of personal privacy. Increases penalty for crime of invasion of personal privacy if defendant has certain prior convictions or person recorded is under 18 years of age.”)

I’m not sure how a mere mortal would find these bill numbers very efficiently, so here are a few keywords: intimate image, visual recording, undergarments, clothing, photographs, etc. Read on about HB 2596:

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If you’ve not been following the news about the University of Oregon archives “leak,” now is the time to start catching up.

Library workers under scrutiny for leak of 22,000 UO documents: Meanwhile, documents leaked to a professor were not returned by the UO’s deadline,” by Diane Dietz, The Register-Guard, Jan. 23, 2015

The Oregonian and the Register Guard have been posting stories. So has U of O blogger, Professor Harbaugh, at his UO Matters: The Unofficial Organ of the University of Oregon blog, which has links to the news stories.

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The OSB Sole and Small Firm Practitioners’ Section executive committee is starting a series of free or low-cost (for non-SSFP members) CLEs that may be of interest to solos or small firm practitioners. The series starts Wednesday, January 21, 2015, and are free to OSB SSFP Section members. Please visit the OSB SSFP website for more information or the SSFP Section website (under construction) for additional contact information.

THE LEGAL LUNCHBOX SERIES

The Sole and Small Firm Practitioners Section of the OSB is pleased to invite all members to attend a series of free seminars/CLEs, to be held from 12:00 p.m. -1:00 pm on the third Wednesday of each month. You can participate via webcast, but members in the Portland area are encouraged to bring your lunch and meet your colleagues at Kafoury and McDougal, who have graciously provided their conference room for our series:

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Your eBook (and its publisher) knows what pages you skipped, it knows what you write in the margins, it keeps track of when you read and when you shop … it knows all about you. It gets worse:

Pew Research Internet Project: The Future of Privacy: Digital Life in 2025: “George Orwell may have been an optimist”

‘”…. This report is a look into the future of privacy in light of the technological change, ever-growing monetization of digital encounters, and shifting relationship of citizens and their governments that is likely to extend through the next decade. “We are at a crossroads,” noted Vytautas Butrimas, the chief adviser to a major government’s ministry. He added a quip from a colleague who has watched the rise of surveillance in all forms, who proclaimed, “George Orwell may have been an optimist,” in imagining “Big Brother.”’ [page 5]

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Complaints, concerns, and questions for DHS? Can’t get an answer from department personnel?

Visit the Governor’s Advocacy Office, which includes the Department of Human Services Ombudsmen, the Children’s Ombudsman, and the DHS Client Complaint or Report of Discrimination process.

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Tom Mighell tackles the question: Why are Passwords So Hard for Lawyers?”

Answer: ZZZZZzzzz. But doze off at your own risk:

Excerpt: “The subject of passwords is one that is both fascinating and frustrating to me. We know that it’s getting easier and easier for hackers to crack our passwords; just three years ago, a nine-digit password would take 44,530 years to crack, but today that same password can be cracked in less than a day, according to Passfault. And yet, when I mention this in speeches that I give, lawyers invariably give a heavy sigh, roll their eyes, and promptly tune out. I know what they’re thinking: “12 digit password? It’s hard enough for me to remember the name of my dog and the numbers 123!” [Link to blog post and blog homepage.]