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Kids Pro Quo (50 Most Powerful People): They Give as Good as They Get

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With apologies to the incomparable Edwin Newman (who first created Kid Pro Quo, the boxer who gave as good as he got, in his book, “Sunday Punch”) and to Consequential Strangers authors (Melinda Bau and Karen Fingerman), who would rightly raise eyebrows at the “most powerful” description of this list.

That said, it was impossible to resist the lure of the Kids Pro Quo list: The 50 Most Powerful People in D.C

(Thank you to the Law Librarian Blog for the link.)

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4 responses to “Kids Pro Quo (50 Most Powerful People): They Give as Good as They Get”

  1. Melinda says:

    Laura, Hi. Word Press let me know that you had referred to Consequential Strangers. Interesting that you would think I would disagree with the 50 most powerful, but I don't. They are powerful.CS are not necessarily powerful, but they do have power in our lives. How did you come across CS in the first place? And what's behind your comment? Would love to hear from you. Melinda melinblau@aol.com
    and hope you'll also check out my blog.

  2. Melinda says:

    Laura, Hi. Word Press let me know that you had referred to Consequential Strangers. Interesting that you would think I would disagree with the 50 most powerful, but I don't. They are powerful.CS are not necessarily powerful, but they do have power in our lives. How did you come across CS in the first place? And what's behind your comment? Would love to hear from you. Melinda melinblau@aol.com
    and hope you'll also check out my blog.

  3. Laura says:

    Hi Melinda:

    Thank you for your Comment on my blog post.

    To answer your questions:

    I remember, at the time of writing that blog post, not quite thinking you would “disagree” with the “most powerful” designation, but that you, and co-author, would raise eyebrows at the designation, which is pretty much what I did. For me, of a wise age (a more accurate description I like to think than “of a certain age” :-), raising eyebrows is always accompanied by a smile, if not a laugh – and crossed fingers for the future.

    I had only recently come across your book and a few days later saw the “most powerful” list. In my own way (see my blog), I put the two together, not always a logical connection for my readers, but definitely eye-raising/smileworthy for some. (I had also recently come across references to the Edwin Newman book and found it again on my shelves, so 2+2+2=18 – LOL!)

    How I found out about your book?: I heard one or both of you interviewed. It would have been around the time of the blog post, though, maybe sometime before. I borrowed the book from the public library so may have had to wait some weeks or months for it. The review was on the radio, most likely NPR or our local affiliate, OPB. My guess would be Fresh Air's Terry Gross, but if not, close by.

    I hope this answers your questions, but, in true librarian form, please let me know if it did not.

    And, thank you for the interesting book! I'll surely check out your blog, too.

    Laura

  4. Melinda Blau says:

    Hi again, Laura. I don't know how long ago you answered me, but thanks, you did a great job. For the paperback, we're changing the subtitle to: Turning Everday Moments in Life-Changing Connections because I realized (after being on a lot of radio programs) that it really wasn't necessary to define CS in the title. People immediately “get” who they are in their life and are happy to give them a name. As we explain in the book, “friend” is shorthand for most of our relationships, but not quite accurate. More important than naming them, the book talks about the important and surprising functions they serve–ergo, the subtitle change. Do keep in touch and tell me what you think of the book.
    The program you heard was “Talk of the Nation” with Neil Conant.

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