Articles Tagged with Federal statutes

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You need to do a little research if you want to sound as if you know what you are talking about, or, as a comedian (more than once) said:

The lesson of that first day in kindergarten was re-taught to me throughout my life: If you think you’re pretty smart, you’re not talking to enough people.” Cameron, Bruce, “The Smartest Guy in an Empty Room,” Funny Times, September 2013, p. 3.

Onward to the All Writs Act:

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You can read a hundred articles about wolves and their prey, including the ODFW Wolf webpages, but not a single one will explain exactly WHY wolves are, or were, on endangered species lists.

If you look hard enough you really can find hundreds of articles on the WHY, but here is an interesting one that sums up the complexity of the issue:

Scientific American: “Can Wolves Bring Back Wilderness? [Excerpt]: People may find it hard to adapt to an ecology of predation and fear,” by Jason Mark on October 9, 2015:

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U.S. Congress at Work:

18 U.S. Code § 2703:

(a) Contents of Wire or Electronic Communications in Electronic Storage.— A governmental entity may require the disclosure by a provider of electronic communication service of the contents of a wire or electronic communication, that is in electronic storage in an electronic communications system for one hundred and eighty days or less, only pursuant to a warrant issued using the procedures described in the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure (or, in the case of a State court, issued using State warrant procedures) by a court of competent jurisdiction….” [Link to the full text of 18 USC 2703 at the Cornell Legal Information website.]

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From Willamette Law Online:  ‘Whitfield v. United States, Case #: 13-9026, Date Filed: January 13, 2015

Scalia, J., delivered the opinion for a unanimous Court.

Full Text Opinion: http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/14pdf/13-9026_11o2.pdf 

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“Free Public Access to Federal Materials on Guide to Law Online

October 14, 2014 by Donna Sokol

This is a guest post by Ann Hemmens, legal reference librarian at the Law Library of Congress.

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Not all statutes are codified, that is, not all laws passed (by Congress and signed by the President) appear in the numbered sections of the U.S. Code.  Sometimes they appear in the code section’s note.
This blog post may not mean anything to you right now, but one day you’ll say “so that’s what Laura was talking about!”
I used to teach this to law students, using the Privacy Act of 1974 as an example, but a federal agency law librarian has written a useful and short memo on the subject so you don’t need me anymore (at least not to explain this!):