Articles Posted in General Legal Research Resources

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Our Oregon Historical Society, and its Oregon Encyclopedia, commemorate the 80th Anniversary of the President’s Executive Order 9066 (2/19/1942).

Visit the OHS Oregon Encyclopedia for this and other documents on the incarceration of Japanese people during World War 2. (Use the Explore tab for an A to Z index.)

Primary Source documents: Overview: Japanese American Wartime Incarceration in Oregon

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Librarians advocate reading widely, especially outside one’s usual fields of interest or even research. (This is the opposite of what most “social media” (aka anti-social media) forces on their customers.)

I came across the phrase “blinded by guilt” in a lighthearted mystery novel and when I did a random search for the phrase, I came across the following article in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. (The “Butt-dialing the devil” article was just a bonus, listed in the “recommended articles” sidebar. Remember this rule: Always Read the Whole Screen.”

Litigators, civil and criminal, and litigants might find some value in the research, if only to store away for future reference.

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The Washington County Law Library now offers eBook access to a variety of legal titles, including some key Oregon legal research materials. The pilot project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of Oregon.

County residents can sign up for access to the eBooks via the Law Library’s website and can contact the Law Library’s “Virtual Information Desk” with any questions. After the initial sign up, the Law Library’s eBooks may be accessed online or by using the LexisNexis Digital Library app from the app store.

Located in downtown Hillsboro, the Washington County Law Library strives to enhance equal access to justice by making sure legal information, resources and tools are available and accessible to everyone. As stated by Law Librarian Lee Van Duzer, “We’re really pleased to be able to make these materials more available to the public. Now people have another way to find the resources they need to be successful in whatever legal challenges they’re facing.”

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Tort Law:

The American Museum of Tort Law has opened up a virtual tour option. The tour will make you a little dizzy and it’s not as user-friendly as one might want, but it’s not bad. I recommend starting with an exploration of the Tort Museum’s website, then clicking on the Online Tour link, and then trying out the Virtual Tour.

Among other tort law history exhibits at the museum, you can read about the “Hot Coffee” case, its persistent myth, and the documentary “Hot Coffee,” which I blogged about in 2011.

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Ken Svengalis, former Rhode Island State Law Librarian, is celebrating the publication of the 25th edition of his unique and invaluable buying guide:

“Legal Information Buyer’s Guide and Reference Manual” (2021 edition)

Purchasing and other information is at the New England Law Press website.

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The Lillian Goldman Law Library at Yale Law School is hosting this Virtual Symposium on Citation and the Law – April 22 and 23, 2021.

This FREE symposium will highlight the scholarship of law librarians and faculty interested in issues ranging from the US News and World Reports rankings for scholarly productivity, to link rot, to empirical research in the use of citations, and more. Keynote speaker Fred Shapiro will set the stage with his paper “The Most-Cited Legal Scholars Revisited” to be published in the University of Chicago Law Review. All the papers will be published in a book by the Hein Company….

Link to the schedule and registration page from Symposium on Citation and the Law.

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Ring in 2021 with Law Library of Congress U.S. Law Webinars

Orientation to Legal Research: U.S. Case Law: Date: Thursday, January 14, 2021, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. EST

Orientation to Law Library Collections: Date: Tuesday, January 26, 2021, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. EST

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Oregon’s Classroom Law Project (CLP) has created a list of: Civics Digital Resources for Remote Learning

During this unprecedented time when teachers must adjust to providing digital resources and connections for their students, Classroom Law Project is committed to providing and curating links to sites, lessons, ideas, and resources that might help you teach remotely. We will update this page as we continue to find resources….” [Link to CLP Civics Resources page.]

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Guest post, from Lee Van Duzer, Washington County Law Librarian, Hillsboro, Oregon:

As we socially distance ourselves and physical spaces are increasingly closed, it is important to revisit online legal research options. The following are free general legal research tools to help you work from home.

Case Law & Statutes

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Official articles of impeachment are voted upon by the U.S. House of Representatives. Look for House Resolutions and House Reports at Congress dot gov.

You can find them in print in large law or government document libraries and usually, though not always easily, online. Some online Congressional research resources are fee-based databases and some are free.

For example, see previous post from September 26, 2019: What Does an Article of Impeachment Look Like? Read Presidents Nixon and Clinton Articles

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