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Yes there is still a U.S. Constitution and it has its own day. Read about it at the Constitution Center and the Library of Congress where they also have Constitution Day Teacher Resources, for teachers and homeschoolers everywhere.

And don’t forget those extraterrestrials and the Bill of Rights.

URLs cited above:

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According to The Oregonian the federal government is using a rarely enforced civil disorder statute to prosecute at least two protesters in Portland (“Feds start leveling rare civil disorder charges against demonstrators for alleged violence at Portland protests,” Sept. 3, 2020). The article notes the law is also being applied in other cities in the United States, and that the law was adopted in 1968 during a period of “civil rights turmoil.” On September 3 two more people were charged under the civil disorder statute: Pointing lasers at officers during Portland protests now leads to federal civil disorder felony allegations, The Oregonian (Sept. 4, 2020).

The law in question is 18 U.S. Code § 231. Civil disorders. Generally the states have broad power to enact criminal statutes, while the federal government is limited to enforcing criminal laws on federal land or property, that involve actions crossing state lines, or in areas explicitly allowed by the U.S. Constitution. So how does the federal government get the ability to enact a broad civil disorder statute?

The answer, is found in a part of the statute itself; subsection (a)(3) reads:

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Who said learning about how laws are made can’t be any fun? Clearly, that person never looked at the Classroom Law Project’s Bill of Rights for Extraterrestrials Lesson Plan for grades 4-12. (It would probably be a lot of fun for grown-ups, too.)

Visit the Resources page of the Classroom Law Project and look for the “Extraterrestrials and Your Rights!” lesson, including handouts you can download.

In this engaging, interactive strategy, introduce the Bill of Rights, Natural Rights, and other constitutional concepts to your students – as a response to extraterrestrials landing in Oregon! On the sidebar are the components you need for this activity and feel free to adjust them to fit your classroom needs. Let us know if you have any questions or would like us to come and try this out with you or for your classroom – it’s a lot of fun, and will encourage fantastic conversation from elementary through college level.” [Visit the Extraterrestrials and Your Rights! page for more information.]

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If you need a quick answer to an Oregon Special Session question, pick up the phone and call your legislator (from the Find Your Legislator form) or the State Legislature’s switchboard (800-332-2313) or call or email a legislative librarian at the State Library of Oregon.

Current Oregon Legislative (General Assembly) Special Session information can be found via the Oregon Legislature’s homepage.

Historic Special Sessions (From the Secretary of State Blue Book (from 1860 to 1-2 years ago).)

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Facts matter (usually, often, or at least eventually, sometimes, maybe, well, we can at least try to read and listen to original sources … please):

Listen to the Unrefined Sophisticates podcast at the Stitcher link below and via other podcast platforms (search unrefined sophisticates for more links):

The Unrefined Sophisticates Podcast: Exclusive Naked Athena of Portland Interview (116 MINS July 24, 2020)

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The Oregon Health Authority has a Covid-19 Testing Site Locator.

You can also call 211 (or visit the 211 Info website)

Note of advice from OHA: “While we are working hard to keep the information about where Oregonians can get a COVID-19 test as up to date as possible, you should contact the site first to make sure testing is still occurring.”

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Research, like good manners, (almost) always helps your cause, to wit:

Please Do Your Research before speaking out on that which you may not know and especially before purloining someone else’s work product.

Sources of Portland, Oregon, news:

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PUGS (Portland Underground Graduate School) Course:

“Your Art is Your Business”

“How creatives can use business and intellectual property knowledge to make a living and protect their art.”

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Remote Online Notarization (RON) law (temporary) was enacted during the first special session of the 2020 Oregon Legislative Assembly:

“​​​​​The Oregon Legislature passed HB 4212A​, which was signed into law by the Governor on June 30, 2020. While this bill contained many concepts, part of it legalizes Remote Online Notarization (RON) through July 2021.

RON allows a commissioned notary public to​ perform notarial acts using audio/video technology for remotely located individuals under certain circumstances using vendors meeting specific requirements. RON also allows notaries from other states to perform Remote Online Notarizations for Oregonians….​” [Link to the Oregon Secretary of State website for official information about remote notarization requirements.]

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They should! There are lots of ways to learn: e.g. while in a public sector job that takes an active role in the agency’s budget process, by working for an elected official, by volunteering on a government committee or for a non-profit that takes part in a local or state government budget process, or, even by reading and self-study.

For example, there is a “Local Budgeting Manual,” among many other useful training and guidance documents on public websites for anyone who wants to learn about budget timelines, requirements, and laws.

From the Local Budget Law page of the Oregon Department of Revenue:

Contact Information