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In honor of Halloween and the need for scary stories, I recommend this June 2021 article from “The Atlantic” for anyone and everyone who wants to believe that information can be found online 1, 5, 50, or possibly 500 years from now. (Hahahaha)

Note: “The Atlantic” is a subscription service, but may still allow a few free article downloads. You can also check if one of your library databases (academic or public) includes access to “The Atlantic.” 

“The Internet Is Rotting: Too much has been lost already. The glue that holds humanity’s knowledge together is coming undone,” by Jonathan Zittrain

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Do the journalists, bloggers, and talking heads who refer endlessly to “Title 42” when speaking or writing about immigration and border issues (usually the U.S. Mexico border) know what Title 42 is? Can those “reporters” cite the exact law? Have they read the so-called “Title 42?”

Saying “Title 42” is about as useful as hearing a radio or podcast host say “it’s Tuesday and it’s 20 minutes past the hour” (which Tuesday and what hour?!), or a subject line that says “Don’t miss today’s meeting!” (“today” has no meaning online, without a date!), or the so-called market reports saying “yesterday, the market ended up 13%” (what market, up from or to what?!). It’s meaningless, which listeners and readers know, but seemingly not the talking heads. Sigh.

Back to “What is Title 42?”

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VINCheck® Lookup at NICB

The National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) has a publicly accessible, free VINCheckⓇ service. Click through services may not be free.

What is a VIN? It’s an acronym for Vehicle Identification Number.

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You can read the enrolled bill and some of its legislative history at the LegiScan Texas website, which can also link you directly to the Texas legislature’s website.

As you read the law, do not confuse these two legal actions:

1) Private civil right of action

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Visit the Portland Archives news and events page for info on and links to Archives Month 2021 events around the state.

Visit their Local Heritage Organizations page for a long list of regional archival collections and professional archivists no self-respecting researcher, speaker, teacher, historian, or other well-informed person would ignore before claiming a modicum of knowledge on a subject.

Have a productive research adventure in 2021!

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I’m no fan of the blood and drugs True Crime sub-genre, but I can’t resist a well written true (or alleged to be true) financial crime story, aka Follow the Money crime, no longer just associated with political crimes.

It’s possible I like them because the best of them are written by people who know their subjects, are excellent story tellers, and who almost always have a sense of humor that takes a slight edge off the outrage.

These are only a few of the many books written about financial and political flim-flams, confidence tricks, swindles, and scams, but they are some of my favorites. There are many more political, financial, and judicial true crime stories I could include … maybe later:

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The national Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) is not the only federal insurance program that exists to protect people who are injured after receiving specific (aka covered) vaccinations.

Visit the VICP website and read the FAQ page to find answers to questions like:

Will the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program provide compensation to individuals injured by COVID-19 vaccine?

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September is Library Card Sign-Up Month. The proclamation was signed by President George H.W. Bush in August 1989. Here’s one link to the law:

Proclamation 6008—National Library Card Sign-Up Month, 1989

For other sources of the law, you can search these keywords: library card sign up month Proclamation 6008, 103 STAT. 3075 (August 1989)

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Ken Svengalis, former Rhode Island State Law Librarian, is celebrating the publication of the 25th edition of his unique and invaluable buying guide:

“Legal Information Buyer’s Guide and Reference Manual” (2021 edition)

Purchasing and other information is at the New England Law Press website.

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U.S. Representative Nadler (D-NY) introduced this bill in Congress on 7/19/21, with bipartisan co-sponsors. The bill has been referred to the Judiciary Committee. You can track its progress from Congress dot gov:

H.R.4501 (2021): To provide for the establishment of the Office for Access to Justice in the Department of Justice, and for other purposes.

Action: 7/19/2021 Introduced and then Referred to the House Committee on the Judiciary

Contact Information