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New public law librarians (MLS & MLS/JD) and new public law library employees usually have to tackle questions of Unauthorized Practice of Law (UPL) and the dreaded “Forms” questions very early in their employment (or careers, if they are in it for the long haul*).

(Non-Oregon new public law library employees reading this blog post can locate similar resources within their own state’s public law librarian world.)

FIRST AND FOREMOST:

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The MULTNOMAH COUNTY HOME RULE CHARTER [Amendments Approved November 8, 2016], states:

“12.40. Appointment of Committee Members.

The charter review committee shall be composed as follows:

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Your State of Oregon Law Library give you FREE access to NOLO publications and the FASTCASE legal research database:

NOLO (aka Nolo Press): “NOLO provides access to full-text legal reference publications written for consumers that allow individuals to learn about specific topics of law.

FASTCASE: “Fastcase collection includes the United States Code, United States Supreme Court and Court of Appeals Cases; and cases, statutes, regulations, court rules, constitutions, attorney general opinions, and session laws for Oregon, Alaska, Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, and Washington.

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Gladwell’s podcasts (now in their 2nd season) are entertaining, enlightening, and law-full (i.e. full of legal history, stories, and “well, that was seriously interesting!” moments).

Don’t be lead astray by podcast episode titles; each episode’s story really will Revise your Assumptions of the meaning of stories you think you know well.

Visit the Revisionist History website.

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You can’t (CANNOT) waltz into an Oregon Small Claims Court and expect to win your case. You have to do your homework:

1) You have to read the book (in public and law libraries and bookstores):

“Using Small Claims Court in Oregon.” by Janay Haas, 2012. (Oregon Legal Guides)

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July 10, 2017, Meeting announcement:

Accessibility and ADA and the new Multnomah County Courthouse

In 2020, Multnomah County will open a new downtown courthouse. Please join the project and design

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Article, from the Oregon State Bar Litigation Section, June/July 2017:

Judge’s Corner:

“Use of Fictitious Names for Parties in Civil Litigation in Oregon,” by The Honorable James Hargreaves (Senior Judge, retired), Lane County Circuit Court (June/July 2017):

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The American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) awarded their 2017 Public Access to Government Information (PAGI) Award to Laura Orr, the former Washington County Law Librarian (2002-2015).

AALL Press Release, excerpt:

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW LIBRARIES ANNOUNCES 2017 PUBLIC ACCESS TO GOVERNMENT INFORMATION AWARD WINNER

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If you think the U.S. Supreme Court posts official versions of their opinions on their website … hahaha … I have a virtual bridge and an inside WH or Congressional source to sell you for $1B dollars. (Tip: Beware of any source who charges too much or too little and read those disclaimers, e.g. click on “Latest Slip Opinions.)

If you think that is the only problem with online Supreme Court opinions, guess again: what about their link rot? See e.g.:

NYT article, “In Supreme Court Opinions, Web Links to Nowhere,” by Adam Liptak, Sept. 23, 2013.

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People like “free.’ People like getting free content from other people who paid for the content. Long live the free-loader, long live the person who spends $20 in time and gas looking for a free parking spot instead of paying $10 for a paid space! It’s the principle, isn’t it?

But sometimes getting “free” is about the journey and the satisfaction earned when putting one’s search skills to the test. Here’s one way to do both, from Aaron at Musings about Librarianship:

5 services to help researchers find free full text instantly & a quick assessment of effectiveness