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1) Articles of Impeachment against President Richard M. Nixon (93rd Congress: 1974): H.Rept. 93-1305): Impeachment of Richard M. Nixon, President of the United States: report of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, Peter W. Rodino, Jr., chairman. (Source: Hathitrust catalog URL. Click on Full View URL for full text.)

2) Articles of Impeachment against President William Jefferson Clinton: H. Rept. 105-830 – IMPEACHMENT OF WILLIAM JEFFERSON CLINTON, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 105th Congress (1997-1998) (Click on PDF link if preferred over TXT version.)

3) Interesting impeachment trivia: Vice President Agnew requested the House to commence an impeachment inquiry. (See also the MSNBC Podcast, Bagman. Excellent storytelling and research.)

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Less wordy than the Mueller Report, and equally bloodless, but no less stunning. Link to report text from the BBC (and soon from many other URLs) or link to the Internet Archive version I saved today.

Note: “Day 1” refers to the Day After (i.e. Friday) an October 31, 2019, no-deal exit from the EU.

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The Internet Archive serves as, among other things, a repository for webpages. Lawyers (especially), historians (always), librarians (of course), and everyone else can save their webpages to the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. (Ue their Save Link Now box.)

I save many of URLs I link to in my blog posts and am frequently astounded to find that too few of those URLs have been saved to the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. These government, nonprofit, NGO, official document, and other URLs should be preserved in the Archive.

If you build, update, rely on website content, please SAVE the URL to the Internet Archive Wayback Machine. Websites come and go and you never know when you might need to reconstruct, recall, provide evidence based on, or otherwise want to view a retrospective snapshot of a particular website.

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Recommended reading – and discussing: with a book group, a salon, over coffee, over beer, and with Portland (Oregon) friends and neighbors:

Bridge City: When does local pride become exclusionary?” by Anna Vo, in Oregon Humanities, July 29, 2019.

…. When you hear about nationalism, you may think of Trumpism, of anti-immigrant sentiment, but I bet you never think of yourself, of Portland. I wonder often about the pro-nature dogma, the cedar and mountain pride, the shoe-and-backpack consumerism entwined with suiting up for a thirty-minute “hike,” or swallowing nature like a fusion chimichanga sushi burrito. The regionalism so many people in Oregon espouse sounds a lot like localized nationalism to me. Its rhetoric can be easily weaponized to promote exclusion. …..” [Link to full article. Archived here.]

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DNA Tests Show Southern Members of Congress and Constituents are 65% Mexican (and 20% French): Results Surpass Congressional Dining Hall Chef’s Prediction Based on the Popularity of “French Fries with Salsa” Side Dish

“Members of Congress Fail American History Test: Only 13% Earn a Barely Passing Grade (60% or better).

Hmmm. Telling lies, making up part-truths, or simple obfuscation is clearly very difficult for some of us, but a piece of cake for others, e.g. Onion writers, Andy Borowitz, advertisement authors, drug and tobacco company CEOs, etc., etc., etc.

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Links to the Martin Luther King, Jr. April 1963 “Letter from Birmingham Jail

Wikipedia article, “Letter from Birmingham Jail” (see under References for links to multiple sources)

University of PA African Studies Center

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The official PDF of the Mueller report has been updated in a subtle but important way,” by Zachary M. Seward, April 22, 2019.” (Qz dot com)

See also:

“Delivering the Mueller Report in Eleven Links,” May 2019 (Jill O’Neill is the Director of Content for NISO dot org.)

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If you haven’t discovered Reith Lectures (BBC, Radio 4), here is your chance. Topics vary and this year’s (2019) lecturer was Jonathan Sumption. The lectures and Q&A that follow are enlightening and entertaining. (It’s a 5-part series.)

“2019: Jonathan Sumption

The Reith Lectures

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Every federal employee knows about the Hatch Act, which dates back to 1939:

Wikipedia Hatch Act article

You can Google the following searches to find out more about the Hatch Act:

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There are print versions of the April 18, 2019, Mueller Report (“Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election“) in the marketplace (although one publication has virtually unreadable tiny print) and there are multiple online versions so take your pick.

Many public libraries have the e-book and some may have the print.

Link to a PDF copy of the report from, among other places, the Wikipedia Mueller Report article, e.g. from the “External links” section of the article.