Articles Posted in Libraries

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September is Library Card Sign-Up Month. The proclamation was signed by President George H.W. Bush in August 1989. Here’s one link to the law:

Proclamation 6008—National Library Card Sign-Up Month, 1989

For other sources of the law, you can search these keywords: library card sign up month Proclamation 6008, 103 STAT. 3075 (August 1989)

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Ken Svengalis, former Rhode Island State Law Librarian, is celebrating the publication of the 25th edition of his unique and invaluable buying guide:

“Legal Information Buyer’s Guide and Reference Manual” (2021 edition)

Purchasing and other information is at the New England Law Press website.

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Excerpts from the full Rare Book Librarian job posting, which you can find at the Yale University careers website:

Required Education and Experience

Master’s degree from an ALA-accredited program for library and information science.

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Open Access and Government Information Librarian

An interesting job for a professional librarian who wants to learn a lot and live in Oregon. It is a tenure-track position with a 9-month academic year. Apply by January 31, 2021:

The Open Access and Government Information Librarian provides expert guidance to campus faculty in finding and using Open Educational Resources (OERs) and other open access information resources and data repositories. In addition, the librarian in this position is responsible for the selection, organization and promotion of U.S. federal government materials, the Oregon state depository collection, and the map collection. The Open Access and Government Information Librarian supervises all activities within the Government Information department of Hannon Library and collaborates with department members to ensure the effective delivery of user services, including reference, instruction, collection management, and the further development of the library’s Bioregion Collection….” [Link to full job description and application.]

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Most organizations and corporations have mission statements in one form or another. (A good business plan will always include one.)

Mission statements are often aspirational but also restrictive, by which I mean they can save the organization from the dreaded “mission creep.” (For a funny “Portlandia” (the TV show) based example of averted mission creep, see below.*)

First, here is a list of 50 county (or public) law library mission statements, courtesy of the 3 Geeks and a Law Blog.

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Stay tuned for changes to our Oregon Legal Research (OLR) website and blog management team. Nothing but good times ahead!

Succession:

I am moving on from owning and managing the Oregon Legal Research (OLR) domains, website, and blog. The current plan is to transfer OLR ownership, over the next few months, to the Washington County Law Library (WCLL).

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WebJunction has been teaching online for more than a decade – and they do a darn good job of it, too.

This class: “Libraries Prepare to Answer Civil Legal Questions in Times of Crisis” will be taught by 2 law librarian stars: Jenny Silbiger, State Law Librarian, Access to Justice Coordinator, Hawaii Supreme Court Law Library, and Joseph Lawson, Deputy Director, Harris County Law Library, Texas.

The live webinar is scheduled for: Thursday, June 11, 2020 / 12:00 pm Pacific, 60 minutes. (Webinar recording and course materials will be available offline to registrants shortly thereafter.)

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If you need legal research assistance, check your county’s law library website for hours and contact information. If your county law library doesn’t have the professional legal research librarians you need, visit one of the Oregon law libraries listed below.

And don’t forget that your own public library reference librarians and library assistants can reach out to Oregon county law librarians for legal research assistance as well.

OCCLL* (Oregon Council of County Law Libraries) will link you to these and other county law libraries:

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Oregon Historical Society Asks Oregonians to Share Their Pandemic Stories

Many of you and your family members are keeping journals (or even just notes on calendars), all of which will be interesting to read AC (After Covid).

Two places to share and record your stories:

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Library school student, librarian, and other information professional survey makers: this post is for you.

Most of us want to help you out, especially if your survey results may help us out, but even if it’s just to support a student or a colleague.

We’re happy to take your survey … IF you follow some basic rules, which most of you never do:

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