Articles Posted in Legal News & Commentary

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Golden Rule of Legal Writing: Never, ever cite to anything you haven’t read carefully.

There is a reason law librarians try to drill that rule into the heads of lawyers and law students (and journalists):

“Is it a “Good” Case? Can You Rely on BCite, KeyCite, and Shepard’s to Tell You?,” by Kristina Niedringhaus, JOTWELL (April 22, 2019) (reviewing Paul Hellyer, Evaluating Shepard’s, KeyCite, and BCite for Case Validation Accuracy, 110 Law Libr. J. 449 (2018)).

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Hilarious April 2019 story out of England, via the BBC:

Judge asked to be relieved of jury duty – because he was the judge in the case.

But it gets worse! The Jury Central Summoning Bureau first told him, no, you’ll have to serve. Ha ha ha. Read the story:

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Is there a journalist reporting on the (not yet released except to Barr, selected Rs and pundits, selected West Wingers, and others?) Mueller Report who has read the Special Counsel regulations (28 CFR 600 et seq)? Did you read the authority (5 U.S.C. 301; 28 U.S.C. 509, 510, 515-519) for and the source of those regulations (64 FR 37042, July 9, 1999 ….)?

Do you know the difference between evidence and proof, levels of proof needed for indictment versus conviction versus impeachment, standards (or levels or burdens) of proof, collusion and conspiracy, etc., etc., etc.?

It’s OK if you don’t know – if you’re willing to learn. If you want a 51 tweet long education in the above (except, you’ll have to read the special counsel regulations yourself), read Seth Abramson’s 51 tweet thread from 3/26/19 (and previous and subsequent threads, for that matter).

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The Oregonian’s 4-part series (starting 2/22/19) on money in Oregon politics:

Polluted by Money: How corporate cash corrupted one of the greenest states in America:

Part One of Four was published on Feb. 22, 2019.

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Meet and listen to Multnomah County Circuit Court Presiding Judge Steven Bushong talk and answer questions about the Rule of Law and the work of the judicial branch of American government.

National Judicial Outreach Week Event

Date: Tuesday, March 5, 2019

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Happy U.S. Constitution Day! There must be a cocktail you can drink to toast the U.S. Constitution, its origins, and improvements (yes, the founders knew the U.S. Constitution would need to be modernized, through – amendments!).

 

 

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“State sued for withholding proposed legislation,” Paris Achen/Capital Bureau, Portland Tribune, September 10, 2018

The Portland Tribune article links to the complaint, filed in Marion County Circuit Court.

Other articles on the lawsuit can be found in:

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Do you want more information about the Oregon Innocence Project and Deschutes County District Attorney investigation that you read about in the Washington Post? See below for link to the Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) podcast featuring an interview with Steve Wax and John Hummel.

Discovery of dog exonerates Oregon man in criminal case” (Wash Post headline)

A dead-dog story helped convict a man of child sex abuse. Then the black lab was found alive.” (Another Washington Post headline)

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The State of Oregon Law Library (SOLL) seeks an Outreach Librarian. The library resides in the Oregon Supreme Court building, part of the Appellate Court Services Division of the Office of the State Court Administrator, for the Oregon Judicial Department.

Visit the Oregon Job Opportunities website for more information.

Unless the job posting is extended, it closes on April 1, 2018 (no fooling).

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TED Talk: How to Put the Power of Law in People’s Hands”

Summary:
What can you do when the wheels of justice don’t turn fast enough? Or when they don’t turn at all? Vivek Maru is working to transform the relationship between people and law, turning law from an abstraction or threat into something that everyone can understand, use and shape. Instead of relying solely on lawyers, Maru started a global network of community paralegals, or barefoot lawyers, who serve in their own communities and break the law down into simple terms to help people find solutions….” [Link to Vivek Maru’s TED Talk Reading List, and link to more TED Talks on justice, law, and crime.]