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The Internet Archive serves as, among other things, a repository for webpages. Lawyers (especially), historians (always), librarians (of course), and everyone else can save their webpages to the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. (Ue their Save Link Now box.)

I save many of URLs I link to in my blog posts and am frequently astounded to find that too few of those URLs have been saved to the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. These government, nonprofit, NGO, official document, and other URLs should be preserved in the Archive.

If you build, update, rely on website content, please SAVE the URL to the Internet Archive Wayback Machine. Websites come and go and you never know when you might need to reconstruct, recall, provide evidence based on, or otherwise want to view a retrospective snapshot of a particular website.

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Recommended reading – and discussing: with a book group, a salon, over coffee, over beer, and with Portland (Oregon) friends and neighbors:

Bridge City: When does local pride become exclusionary?” by Anna Vo, in Oregon Humanities, July 29, 2019.

…. When you hear about nationalism, you may think of Trumpism, of anti-immigrant sentiment, but I bet you never think of yourself, of Portland. I wonder often about the pro-nature dogma, the cedar and mountain pride, the shoe-and-backpack consumerism entwined with suiting up for a thirty-minute “hike,” or swallowing nature like a fusion chimichanga sushi burrito. The regionalism so many people in Oregon espouse sounds a lot like localized nationalism to me. Its rhetoric can be easily weaponized to promote exclusion. …..” [Link to full article. Archived here.]

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DNA Tests Show Southern Members of Congress and Constituents are 65% Mexican (and 20% French): Results Surpass Congressional Dining Hall Chef’s Prediction Based on the Popularity of “French Fries with Salsa” Side Dish

“Members of Congress Fail American History Test: Only 13% Earn a Barely Passing Grade (60% or better).

Hmmm. Telling lies, making up part-truths, or simple obfuscation is clearly very difficult for some of us, but a piece of cake for others, e.g. Onion writers, Andy Borowitz, advertisement authors, drug and tobacco company CEOs, etc., etc., etc.

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“How to Preserve Your Family Memories, Letters and Trinkets,” by Kelsey McKinney, New York Times, 2/8/18.

Let this article be a starting point if you haven’t already researched this subject. Please do not assume “common sense” will guide you, unless you are an archivist.

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The 12/29/17 episode of On the Media was magnificent. It’s almost always a fabulous radio program / podcast, but they outdid themselves with this year-end episode titled: The Feelings Show. You will listen, brighten, roll your eyes, breathe, laugh, wonder, frown, groan, and then head off for that proverbial beer. (It’s a meme, apparently, that beer with friends thing, or maybe a trope? Who knows? I’m not complaining; it’s also a kind of hyyge.)

So, tune in, not out, and be prepared to want to play the episode again, and even again. It’s that good – and good for you. From Rebecca Solnit, to the worst meditator ever (but the nicest and funniest), to one of our two beloved Radio Lab hosts, Jad Abumrad – and our equally beloved On the Media hosts. [Link to The Feelings Show episode.]  Groovy, man.

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Gladwell’s podcasts (now in their 2nd season) are entertaining, enlightening, and law-full (i.e. full of legal history, stories, and “well, that was seriously interesting!” moments).

Don’t be lead astray by podcast episode titles; each episode’s story really will Revise your Assumptions of the meaning of stories you think you know well.

Visit the Revisionist History website.

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Oregon author: “Death: An Oral History,” a book by Casey Jarman:

Publisher Comments:
In this illuminating collection of oral-history style interviews, Casey Jarman talks to a funeral industry watchdog about the (often shady) history of the death trade; he hears how songwriter David Bazan lost his faith while trying to hold on to his family; he learns about cartoonist Art Spiegelman using his college LSD trips to explain death to his children; and he gets to know his own grandparents, posthumously. These are stories of loss, rebuilding, wonder, and wild speculation featuring everyone from philosophers to former death row wardens and hospice volunteers. In these moving, enlightening, and often funny conversations, the end is only the beginning….” [Link to publisher’s website.]

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“How John Hersey’s Hiroshima revealed the horror of the bomb,” by Caroline Raphael, BBC Magazine, 22 August 2016,

The BBC news magazine reports on this anniversary and links to their 1948 radio broadcast recording of the original 31 August 1946 New Yorker Hersey article. which was the only article the New Yorker published in that edition.

Coincidentally, when I went hunting for my copy of Hiroshima, I found it next to my yellowed paperback copy of “The Bridge of San Luis Rey.”

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Demon Lake:

Is there anything better than astronaut photography (and is anyone wiser than some of our astronauts)? You can just Google [astronaut photographs etc] or start with this view of Lake of the Demon. (And here’s the Wikipeida Lake Rakshastal entry.) (And read Chris Hadfield’s books to your children for an inspirational, and perspirational, adventure.)

Cloud Appreciation Society: