Articles Tagged with Students

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Read on for a bit of Oregon “Civics Education” from me:

Senate Bill 513 A (2021) requires that Oregon high school students receive one half-credit in civics education prior to graduation. It has been approved by both legislative chambers and will (we assume) be signed by the Governor. (Visit the Governor’s homepage, look under the Administration tab, and click on the Bills Signed link for a list.)

How this law will be implemented will be fun, um, interesting to watch. It appears everyone is fairly realistic about the speed of this process. The bill says: “Applies to high school diplomas awarded on or after January 1, 2026.”

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Portland, Oregon: CLASSROOM LAW PROJECT is looking for a PROGRAM MANAGER

Excerpt: “POSITION DESCRIPTION

The Program Manager (PM) will lead the collaborative CLP team effort to develop and deliver our Mock Trial program, including statewide student competitions and showcases, as well as related professional development workshops, and collaboration with teachers to support their implementation of these active-learning strategies in their classrooms. In addition, the PM will serve as the instructor for the Street Law seminar at Lewis & Clark Law School, which places law students in high school classrooms to teach lessons in practical law. The PM will also oversee our annual Law Day Conference for Students and We the Readers Book Club for teachers, and contribute to development and implementation of our major annual events for teachers, the Oregon Civics Conference for Teachers and the Summer Institute, as well as our online Educator Resource Community. They will provide active support across all CLP programs including teacher, student, and volunteer recruitment, relationship development within the legal and education communities, and representation of CLP and its civics education mission in a variety of public venues.

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The Classroom Law Project will be presenting the 2021 Law Day Conference for Students as a virtual event April 26, 2021.

The 2021 Law Day Conference for Students will take place online the week of April 26-30, 2021.

We are offering a slate of resources to help facilitate Law Day engagement with your students, including:

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A new legal self-help book for Oregon college and university students has been released:

Oregon’s Legal Guide for College Students,” by Janay Haas, an Oregon attorney and the author of a number of Oregon legal self-help publications including, “Using Small Claims Court in Oregon.

The author provides updates to both publications at Oregon Legal Guides.

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1) COVID-19 Resources for Students and Parents, from the Oregon Department of Education, including topics such as civil rights and civic engagement, death, mental health, and much more:

This page contains the most recent information available on how the 2019 Novel Coronavirus is affecting schools in Oregon. Please email us with any questions. If you have an urgent health need, please contact your local health department or health care provider.” [Link to website]

2) Senior Loneliness Line, About:

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How to Evaluate Covid-19 Resources:

I created this list for my Oregon librarian community (and with their invaluable assistance) but others may find the list useful.

I include full URLs, some of which I entered into the Internet Archive Wayback Machine, and sufficient bibliographic info to enable readers to locate new URLs if the ones listed break.

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It’s not new news that most U.S.-born American citizens who’ve been through and even graduated from our educational institutions could not pass the Naturalization Test with anything close to barely-passing scores on the first try – so is this story any surprise?

Teaching Students That Judge Judy Is Not a Supreme Court Justice, by Elizabeth A. Harris, New York Times, Nov. 9, 2016

We all aim to do a better job learning about our country’s and the world’s history and laws and maybe also support, volunteer for, or participate in Oregon’s Classroom Law Project and others like it around the country. Maybe the next generations will do better – at least we can hope they will try.

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