Articles Tagged with U.S. Constitution

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There are print versions of the April 18, 2019, Mueller Report (“Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election“) in the marketplace (although one publication has virtually unreadable tiny print) and there are multiple online versions so take your pick.

Many public libraries have the e-book and some may have the print.

Link to a PDF copy of the report from, among other places, the Wikipedia Mueller Report article, e.g. from the “External links” section of the article.

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Without access to a library that subscribes to a Congressional documents database (or that has retained the print), you will have a devil of a time finding many Congressional documents, especially those before the 94th Congress (1975-76) or after 1865. (See the LOC Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation, the National Archives, or the GPO Congressional Documents database.)

You might want to try Congress dot gov, where you’ll find bills and resolutions and, hmmm – no reports.

Let’s say you want to find this document, which is a “report.”

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Short of performing a bundy-ectomy (formerly reserved for Al or Ted), let’s get another view of this particular cathedral. Here is an old Law Librarian’s take on protest and occupation:

Read a Book, Read the Law:

The history of protest goes back to the beginning of human time (check out the Flintstones if you doubt me).

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If you haven’t seen these 2 articles in your news feeds then you’re not doing your consumer law education reading:

New York Times articles, by Jessica Silver-Greenberg and Michael Corkery, November 2015:

Beware the Fine Print, Part I: Arbitration Everywhere, Stacking the Deck of Justice

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The Martindale dot com Legal Library is a source of many types of legal documents, including articles like this one:

“Taking the Fifth – A quick reference,” by Charles M. Farano, attorney.

Excerpt: “All jokes aside, when and why does a person ‘Take the fifth’?

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Deadline is March 15, 2013!

The First Amendment Cartoon Contest homepage has entry rules, tips and tricks for creating comics, and links to previous contest submissions and winners.

Since the earliest days of the American republic, cartoonists have entertained us, drawn attention to the issues of the day, and provoked discussion. In short, cartoons contribute to our civic life.

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Is rewriting the U.S. Constitution really that much of a “dangerous idea?”

See, e.g. Op-Ed Contributor, Louis Michael Seidman, “Let’s Give Up on the Constitution,” New York Times, December 30, 2012.

If business and labor models are changing, why aren’t government models?

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This is not a rhetorical or even a political question. It is a school assignment! Hurrah for teachers, especially those who try out their own assignments before handing them over to their students (and their students’ parents).

Librarians get to help answer students’ reference and research questions, public librarians more than law librarians, but we (Oregon law librarians, that is) also often have the opportunity and honor to pitch in to help students answer their law-related questions, especially when the question comes through L-net, the Oregon statewide online reference service. (Many states have one of these online reference services, in addition to email/IM reference services offered through individual libraries or library systems.)

So, how about that Abuse of Power and Constitutions assignment? It had a follow-up exercise too: “Give an example of a nation that is not a constitutional government.”