Articles Tagged with Legal publishers

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The Lillian Goldman Law Library at Yale Law School is hosting this Virtual Symposium on Citation and the Law – April 22 and 23, 2021.

This FREE symposium will highlight the scholarship of law librarians and faculty interested in issues ranging from the US News and World Reports rankings for scholarly productivity, to link rot, to empirical research in the use of citations, and more. Keynote speaker Fred Shapiro will set the stage with his paper “The Most-Cited Legal Scholars Revisited” to be published in the University of Chicago Law Review. All the papers will be published in a book by the Hein Company….

Link to the schedule and registration page from Symposium on Citation and the Law.

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Citing law back to Wheaton v. Peters, 33 U.S. (8 Pet.) 591 (1834), “Fastcase maintains that public law cannot be copyrighted ….” [Quoted from Ambrogi, Feb. 6, 2016, article.]

Wheaton v. Peters (read the case at Justia, via Wikipedia, or search the case name for other caselaw sources, e.g. Google Scholar or Cornell LII)

Track Fastcase v. Casemaker news developments at Law Sites Blog and other legal news sources:

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From Dewey B Strategic (always worth reading – not sure if there is an audio version):

Tuesday, June 2, 2015: “Listen up: Isn’t it time for Legal Publishers to Offer Audio News Playlists? Modio Legal Is Open and Ready For Business” (And read the Comments, too.)

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Symposium: 404/File Not Found: Link Rot, Legal Citation and Projects to Preserve Precedent:

“The Web is fluid and mutable, and this is a “feature” rather than a “bug”. But it also creates challenges in the legal environment (and elsewhere) when fixed content is necessary for legal writers to support their conclusions. Judges, attorneys, academics, and others using citations need systems and practices to preserve web content as it exists in a particular moment in time, and make it reliably available.

On October 24, 2014 Georgetown University Law Library in Washington, D.C. will host a symposium that explores the problem of link and reference rot.” [Link to symposium website.]

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For my regular readers who might want a break from the holiday madness and might (ho ho ho) be wondering about that $5.2m verdict win in the lawsuit filed by 2 law professors against “West publishing” (now a family member of theThomson Reuters corporation) here are a some links:

1) Jonathan Turley blog post

The funniest Comment: “Regardless of such appeals, these two professors should be given credit for finally finding a way to become millionaires from a state law treatise. That alone will make them living Gods among legal academics.”

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