Articles Tagged with County law libraries

Published on:

By

The following Oregon county law libraries purchase and lend current OSB and OLI CLE course materials for independent study (and MCLE credit):  Clackamas, Lane, Marion, Multnomah, and Washington.

You can find more information on borrowing county law library CLEs at the Oregon Legal Research blogpost: Oregon Continuing Legal Education (CLE) Course Materials in Law Libraries

For information about the Washington County Law Library collection, visit our CLE Information pages.

Published on:

By

The following Oregon county law libraries purchase and lend current OSB and OLI CLE course materials for independent study (and MCLE credit):  Clackamas, Lane, Marion, Multnomah, and Washington.

You can find more information at the Oregon Legal Research blog post:

Oregon Continuing Legal Education (CLE) Course Materials in Law Libraries

Published on:

By

If you are a public law librarian, a public law library trustee, or interested in pursuing a career in public law librarianship, here’s a great book and a book review:

Public Law Librarianship: Objectives, Challenges, and Solutions,” by Laurie Selwyn and Virginia Eldridge. IGI Global, 2012, 281 pages.

We have a copy in our Law Library and your law library may have one, too.

Published on:

By

Question: WHO uses the Oregon county law libraries and for what purpose(s)?

Answer: Thousands of people use the Oregon county law libraries, because no other publicly accessible library has their specialized legal research resources, including databases, books, and professional law librarians.

More WHO answers: Government attorneys and other employees, metro-area residents, solo and small law firm attorneys who assist clients with limited income, pro se (self-represented) litigants, especially those with family, small estate, debt collection, landlord-tenant, and traffic court questions, middle and high school students, college, law school, and paralegal students, tax professionals, out of state and non-U.S. attorneys and self-represented litigants with legal interests in Oregon, and more all use the public (county) law library.