Articles Tagged with adoption

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Oregon lawyers and law librarians teach Continuing Legal Education (CLE) programs (for little or no remuneration). Two upcoming programs from NBI:

1) I’m teaching one unit of this Legal Research CLE (NBI), that will be held in downtown Portland:

Find it Free and Fast on the Net: Strategies for Legal Research on the Web

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You will need to research statutes and regulations on adult adoption in Oregon, but the following might be good places to start to get an overview of the process, sample forms, and other helpful tips:

1) Link to the Oregon State Bar (OSB) brochure on adoption, from the OSB website (if this direct link doesn’t work). (There is a small section on Adult Adoptions in the Adoption brochure.)

2) A 2003 Oregon State Bar CLE,  “The ABC’s of Adoption” (in print only): this is not current law, but will give a good overview of the whys and wherefores of adult adoption.

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Public law librarians are frequently asked how a stepparent can adopt a child. Non-attorneys think this is a simple legal procedure and all they need are “forms.” (And no, no, no … a name change will not accomplish the same purpose.)

It is not simple (repeat, IT IS NOT SIMPLE). If you prepare and file the wrong documents, at best you need to prepare and file again (and pay the fees again); at worst, everything (repeat, EVERYTHING) goes wrong and the parties who you intended to benefit from the transaction may end up paying the price, in ways too excruciatingly sad to contemplate.

But do contemplate what could go wrong and PLEASE consult an OREGON attorney before you prepare and file any paperwork. If you use an unseen, untried online service, make sure you read ALL THE FINE PRINT and consult an Oregon attorney.

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Bend Bulletin story by Sheila Miller, on January 6th, 2007, “Obscure law keeps Bend father from challenging adoption.

Excerpt from full article:

I think that most men have not a clue how quickly they lose their rights in the state of Oregon,” Dick said. “If you are a male and wish to assert your rights to a child, you should go through every step possible and beyond … so there’s no question.”