Articles Tagged with Foreign and international law

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TED Talk: How to Put the Power of Law in People’s Hands”

Summary:
What can you do when the wheels of justice don’t turn fast enough? Or when they don’t turn at all? Vivek Maru is working to transform the relationship between people and law, turning law from an abstraction or threat into something that everyone can understand, use and shape. Instead of relying solely on lawyers, Maru started a global network of community paralegals, or barefoot lawyers, who serve in their own communities and break the law down into simple terms to help people find solutions….” [Link to Vivek Maru’s TED Talk Reading List, and link to more TED Talks on justice, law, and crime.]

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In a case that will be of interest for those following the Children’s Trust lawsuit:

“In New Zealand, Lands and Rivers Can Be People (Legally Speaking),” by Bryant Rousseau, July 13, 2016

Can a stretch of land be a person in the eyes of the law? Can a body of water?

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A country’s financial health, among other measures, depends a lot on views of how corrupt its political and financial leaders and systems are rated. (E.g. would you invest in a country where corruption is high, where you can’t record officially and protect in the country’s courts your financial and real estate investments, where corporate and government employees are “on the take,” etc?)

Here are some Corruption Ranking sources of information:

Transparency International (or select an individual country) and read their “What is (and Costs of) corruption” pages. And the Wikipedia page.

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Just Google these words: brexit not legally binding

The voting takes place on Thursday, June 23, 2016.

See also “Neil Walker: The Brexit Vote: The Wrong Question for Britain and Europe, linked to from the UK Current Awareness Blog.

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If you’re not an expert researcher or if you don’t have access to a large law library with professional foreign and international law librarians, the key to productive legal research is the “Legal Research Guide,” most of which are created by those professional and expert law librarians, many of whom also have US and foreign law degrees.

For example:

1) NYU’s GlobalLex (sample Researching Canadian Law)

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PI Buzz has a post, with Comments, about a Mexican court records database: Mexico Court Record Index Online.

Finding other countries’ court records databases doesn’t appear to be that difficult in a Google World, however, you should always try and talk to people who use those databases professionally to find out the pitfalls, the shortcomings, the strengths, and the alternatives. Private investigators and librarians who specialized in public and criminal records searching are excellent resources for database evaluations.

(PI Buzz also has a series of articles about Sunshine Week and government transparency.)