Articles Tagged with Legal ethics

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The Law Librarian, the Washington County Bar Association, the Law Library Committee, and the Oregon State Bar consider it a serious matter when attorneys do not return borrowed Law Library materials. Please note OSB Rule of Professional Conduct 8.4(a) & ORS 164.005, 164.015, 357.975 & 357.990

More about law book page thefts at the Legal Research is Easy blog: This Just Torques my Shorts.

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“13 States Have Adopted Ethical Duty of Technology Competence,” by Robert Ambrogi, 3/16/15:

“In 2012, something happened that I called a sea change in the legal profession: The American Bar Association formally approved a change to the Model Rules of Professional Conduct to make clear that lawyers have a duty to be competent not only in the law and its practice, but also in technology….” [Link to full blog post.]

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See the Portland premiere of “Kids for Cash,” the documentary about a judge who received millions of dollars from privately-owned juvenile detention centers by ordering the incarceration of 3,000 children.

Link to the following event information from the Youth, Rights, Justice (an independent nonprofit) website:

Tickets for the June 22nd Portland Premiere

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This Oregon Law Practice Management post, from 3/25/13, maybe should be required reading:

“The Ethical Minefield of Using Social Media for Investigation”

Excerpt: “In late February, the Oregon State Bar Board of Governors approved OSB Formal Opinion No. 2013-189.  Following in the footsteps of opinions about metadata (187) and cloud computing (188), the bar seeks to address the ethical minefield of using social media to investigate an opposing party, a witness, or a juror….”  [Link to full blog post.]

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Oregon Personal Injury Lawyer Blog has this informative post: “Another Remedy for Clients Ripped Off by Oregon Lawyers,” March 20, 2012

People call me when they have trouble with their lawyers. Often they want me to sue for legal malpractice. However, Oregon provides another route to seek compensation when a client loses money because an Oregon attorney is dishonest or crooked. That’s the Client Security Fund….” (Read the full blog post.)

Disclaimer: The information provided on this blog is for research purposes only.  We do not provide legal advice, nor do we endorse any person, product, or company.