Articles Tagged with neighbor law

Published on:

By

Oregon v. Lang, 273 Or App 113 (2015), (Benton County Circuit Court CM1320460; A154498)

Citations below are to the online, unofficial advance sheet version of this case, and available for viewing (at least as of today) at: http://www.publications.ojd.state.or.us/docs/A154498.pdf

This is another case that would be quite instructive to laypeople interested in the law, assuming they read the whole case and also perhaps talk to a lawyer or judge about it, rather than relying on a brief news report – or a blog post.

Published on:

By

A recent Oregonian news story: “Aloha man admits to attacking his neighbor for trimming shade trees,” by Roger Gregory, December 13, 2011.  The sentence?

“…Sentence: Bosket was sentenced to six months in jail, followed by five years of formal probation. Bosket was ordered to pay $3,579 in fines and fees and $1,366.19 in restitution. Bosket received the court’s anger/mental health package as part of his probation, according to Nadya Martin, deputy district attorney for Washington County. Bosket is to have no contact with the victim and is not to live at the Aloha address, Martin said.” [Link to full article.]

We’re not all lucky enough to have awesome neighbors.  Librarians, public and law, are asked legal questions all the time that fall under the Neighbor Law classification.

Published on:

By

Who said legal research wasn’t fun? Not I.

Read a Gallagher Blog post about researching local laws, Enact Locally, citing 102 Law Library Journal 497, especially the article’s section on Dog Poop.

Dog Law, and its companion, Neighbor Law, are good tests of your own peacemaking and diplomatic skills.

Published on:

By

This is a legal reference question that comes up again and again and again and …..

What can I do about my neighbor’s barking dog?

It depends, of course, but don’t go crazy. There are usually ways to deal with the problem, although it takes tact, persistence, more tact, creativity, collaboration, and sheer, uh, doggedness.

Remember, a constantly barking dog is not a happy dog and you are likely doing a good deed, at least for the dog, and even sometimes for the owner.

Published on:

By

A peacock moved into my and my neighbors’ adjoining yards (in Mt. Tabor) a couple of weeks ago and I’ve been wracking my brain trying to come up with a legal research or law library angle on the situation.

(The fact that neighbor kids have named it Bismarck doesn’t help, except for the laugh factor. You know, that crested helmet thing, though how they got to Bismarck I’m not entirely sure, except for the perils of high school history textbooks nowadays. It also doesn’t help that peacocks are incredibly beautiful and fascinating to watch – especially the way they watch US from their high perches, fences, trees, etc. Do we really want him to go away?)

But, I have said I can find a legal research / law library angle to just about anything in life, so here goes:

Published on:

By

The Oregonian’s In Portland article (11/15/07) by Edward Hershey, “Dog dispute spotlights law with no teeth,” gives one a fair idea why lawyers exist. The article also give one a fair idea why zoning laws, neighborhood associations, neighbor-law books, and perhaps even dogs, not to mention doggy-day care businesses, exist.

So when you hear anyone say, “it’s not rocket science” when talking about drafting laws or contracts, or interpreting them, step back slowly and walk away – and for heaven’s sake, don’t sign on their bottom lines.

Excerpt (full story here):