Articles Posted in Libraries

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New public law librarians (MLS & MLS/JD) and new public law library employees usually have to tackle questions of Unauthorized Practice of Law (UPL) and the dreaded “Forms” questions very early in their employment (or careers, if they are in it for the long haul*).

(Non-Oregon new public law library employees reading this blog post can locate similar resources within their own state’s public law librarian world.)

FIRST AND FOREMOST:

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Your digital photos, letters, books, articles, documents, messages, etc. have no existence unless you pay attention to their preservation – or without electricity, for that matter. (You can’t really hold Zeros and Ones, Nothingness if you will, in your hands, let alone bequeath Nothingness to your heirs without taking serious steps to preserve and authenticate the data.)

See, e.g. from Moritz Law Library at The Ohio State University for what PURLs are:

Research Tip: What is “Permanent” Online?

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This time it’s a county law librarian, Jennifer Dalglish, Director of the Clackamas County Law Library.

The President’s Public Leadership Award recognizes outstanding contributions to the bench and bar by individuals who are not members of the Oregon State Bar. This year’s recipient is Jennifer Dalglish.” (Oregon State Bar Annual Awards, December 8, 2016. I saved today’s view of this site at the Internet Archive.)

Previous Oregon public law librarian honoree: Cathryn Bowie, Oregon State Law Librarian.

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Every legal researcher needs archived, historic or just plain out of print documents once in a while.

Oregon has you covered. If you’re a crypto or an avowed historian, writer, or any other type of bibliographic spelunker, check out the Oregon Archives Crawl this October 8, 2016:

2016 Oregon Archives Crawl

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First: Librarians, please do not make legal decisions, copyright or otherwise, for your employer (or your own business for that matter) if there is possible litigation down the road. Do not be penny wise and pound foolish. Your library employer has, or should have, a lawyer who is paid for making these decisions that will keep you and the institution from getting sued. Keep in mind that it is not just a matter of right or wrong, lawful or unlawful, win or lose. It takes time and money to defend yourself in a lawsuit, frivolous or not. Wouldn’t you rather spend that time and money on services for your library’s patrons?

Now, on to those Copyright Tools for Librarians, from the February 2016 Legal Research Plus blog post, and their link to the ALA Copyright Tools website.

Hat tip to Legal Research Plus for this and many other research tips (and for their Law Library blog).

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If you’re not tracking news of Robot Lawyers then you’re not keeping up with the legal research profession.

No, not a “robotic” lawyer, but the Artificial Intelligence (AI) kind. See lots of robot, and AI related, lawyer news at LawSites and 3 Geeks and a Law Blog.

These developments are neither good nor bad. It’s a process and you have time to think, explore, experiment, and eventually panic, as humans always do. (Look at Wall Street traders. They panic sooner and more than almost anybody, although, admittedly, many of them are ruled by robots and robotic mentors.)

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If your latest novel, or dinner table conversation, includes a duel, here’s a useful and humorous blog post for you from In Custodia Legis, a Law Librarians of Congress blog:

“So, you’ve been challenged to a duel. What are the rules?,” June 2, 2016 by Robert Brammer.

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Espresso Machines are Lousy Substitutes for Law Library Leadership (3 Geeks and a Law Blog 4/22/16 blog post):

“…. Law Librarianship is not about the number of books on the shelf. It is not about turning shelves into collaboration spaces or coffee bars. It is about positioning the firm in a manner that aligns resources, internal and external; human and information, in a way that puts the firm on a better competitive footing. It’s about risk-management. It’s about negotiating the best deals with very expensive vendors. It’s about evaluating what is, and what is not needed to support the practices of the firm. It takes a strong leader, one with vision of where the law library fits in the strategic goals of the firm, in order to guide the firm on the correct path. Leaving these leadership positions empty, or eliminating them altogether may have short-term financial gains, but long-term repercussions that will plague firms for many years to come….” [Link to full article.]

Read more law librarian / law firm / client management posts from 3 Geeks and a Law Blog and other ABA Law Blawgs.