Articles Tagged with Bicycles

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Maybe you saw the recent New York Times Magazine Tip: “How to Make a Citizen’s Arrest,” by Malia Wollan, May 6, 2016. (Also in their “Crime and Criminals” library.)

Maybe you wondered about Oregon’s laws on citizen’s arrests?

Maybe you also wondered if Portland, Oregon, means business with its Vision Zero plan (zero traffic-related fatalities and serious injuries)?

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From: “Seattle Public Library Puts Books on Bikes”: “The library is a zebra-print lunch box tucked into the back of a pedicab and stuffed with old-fashioned paperbacks and digital LibraryBoxen.”

To: Mobile Mini Libraries Pepper SXSW

To: LibraryBox

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Are you allowed to ride your bicycle on that sidewalk?
Did you just get run over by a bicycle while you were walking on the sidewalk?  Do you wonder if that bicycle should even be on that sidewalk?
You need to look at your local ordinances first – or call your local elected officials – they write the laws.  For some of us, our favorite bicycling, teaching, blogging, and writing lawyer, Ray Thomas, has done a lot of the legal research.
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This horrifying speed-of-light crash shows how fast accidents (of all kinds) occur and how not to share the road.

Portland metro-area newspapers, bloggers, elected officials, and advocacy groups are all trying to find common ground (so to speak and yes, I’m once again the mistress of understatement) on how pedestrians, bicyclists, and drivers can share the road.

My advice of the day for drivers and bicyclists: Look RIGHT before turning right, not just left and for crying out loud, SLOW DOWN. It’s your children and other loved ones who are at risk on the road.

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See this Oregon Court of Appeals case, State v Rowe, Docket no. A128400. From the OJD Media Release page (use drop-down menu to get to the Ct of App):

Defendant appeals his convictions for impeding traffic, ORS 811.130, and failure to obey a police officer, ORS 811.535. Defendant was standing next to his bicycle on a sidewalk in Portland when he refused a police officer’s order to “move along.” Held: To be convicted of impeding traffic, defendant had to have been “riding a bicycle.” To be convicted of failure to obey, the officer’s order had to have been lawful. On appeal, the state concedes that it failed to prove that defendant was riding a bicycle. Further, the state concedes that no other lawful basis existed for the officer to have ordered defendant to move. Reversed.”