Articles Tagged with Cannabis

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The Oregon Legislature’s 2014 SB 1531 is the bill of the hour (and the day and maybe the Session) and the Oregonian has been tracking the story, along with other news sources around the state. Many Oregon cities and communities are debating the issue and some have already passed laws.

The Oregonian has (among other medical marijuana articles) this useful 2/14/14 compilation of local laws: Medical marijuana: Oregon cities that have banned dispensaries

The Municipal Research and Services Center of Washington (state) has their own compilation of medical marijuana laws.

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New marijuana laws in Washington and Colorado raise the bar for dog training: Here’s a blog post from the Gallagher Law Library (UW) blog:

Drug Dogs Going Back to School

The blog post also includes a reference to a recent Oregon Law Review article: “The current issue of the Oregon Law Review (available free in PDF) is a symposium on drug policy. It includes Jane Bambauer, Defending the Dog, 91 Or. L. Rev. 1203 (2013). The author says “This short essay makes the uneasy case for the narcotics dog….”

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New to the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program and not sure where to turn first?

To find information and dispensaries, you have a few choices, but start with your doctor or contact the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program. You can find all sorts of information in advertisements, but it’s always good to start with official sources first.

Disclaimer: The information provided on this blog is for research purposes only.  We do not provide legal advice, nor do we endorse any person, product, or company.

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Legislators don’t draft statutes, which should be a surprise to no one. (Have you ever tried to read your state or federal statutes?! Just as bad, try reading the Oregon Constitution in order to find an answer to a simple question.)

Drafting statutes is an art and a craft and we should be thankful that our state and federal legislators don’t do the actual drafting, although, it would be nice if they made sure the final statutes themselves made sense, not just listened to and voted on what was “intended.” But we are all human, or most of us are in any event, and there is a limit to how much we can fit into 24 hours.

Anyway, legislative staff members, lobbyists, and sometimes ordinary citizens draft or participate in the drafting of statutes, and it sometimes starts with op ed pieces proposing new legislation, like this:

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Sansone v. Gordon and releated cases:
Who better than the nation’s highest court to decide if medical marijuana users have a right to concealed handgun licenses?
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“… Today, the Oregon Supreme Court held that sheriffs must issue concealed handgun licenses to applicants who meet the statutory requirements for such issuance, regardless of the applicants’ use of medical marijuana. In doing so, the Court rejected arguments raised by sheriffs from two different counties that, to the extent that Oregon’s concealed handgun licensing statute does not concern itself with an applicant’s use of marijuana, it is preempted by a federal statute that prohibits possession of a firearm by any unlawful user of a controlled substance….”  [Link to OJD Media Releases.]
Link to full (consolidated) case:  WILLIS v. WINTERS (CC 07-2755-Z7; CA A139875; SC S058645), SANSONE v. GORDON, STEVEN SCHWERDT v. GORDON, LEE WALLICK v. GORDON, (CC C073809CV, C0073810CV, C073811CV; CA A139802; SC S058642)  [Link to full Oregon Supreme Court case.]
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Read full, and official, text of measures at Oregon Secretary of State Elections Division (and the Initiative, Referendum and Referral search form).

Measure 70: home ownership loans for Oregon veterans

Measure 71: changes biennial legislature to annual sessions

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The Oregon Court of Appeals, June 16, 2010, case Willis V. Winters (A139875) about controlled substances and guns:

Wollheim, P. J.

Respondent, the Jackson County Sheriff, appeals a judgment of the circuit court that ordered him to renew a concealed handgun license issued to petitioner, a medical marijuana user. The sheriff concedes that petitioner met the requirements for issuance of a concealed handgun license set forth in ORS 166.291. He nevertheless asserts that Oregon’s concealed handgun licensing statutes are preempted by federal law in this instance, because “an unlawful user * * * of any controlled substance” cannot lawfully possess a firearm under 18 USC section 922(g) of the federal Gun Control Act.(1) The circuit court rejected the sheriff’s preemption argument and ordered him to issue a renewal of petitioner’s concealed handgun license. We agree with the circuit court’s conclusion that federal law does not preempt this state’s concealed handgun licensing statutes, and we therefore affirm…. “ Link to Media Releases or full-text)

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The Media Release says “Cases decided April 15, 2010.” The case itself says “Filed April 14, 2010.” Both are referring to this case:

Emerald Steel Fabricators, Inc., v. Bureau of Labor and Industries, (BOLI 3004) (CA A130422) (SC S056265)

From the April 15, 2010, Media Release:

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