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Do you ever notice that new words come to one’s attention in waves?

I’ve run across this word several times in the past few weeks – and it’s not one to trip off the tongue, so to speak, with any regularity, although maybe it should: misprision

Wikipedia entry: “Misprision (from Old French: mesprendre, modern French: se méprendre, “to misunderstand”) is a term of English law used to describe certain kinds of offence. Writers on criminal law usually divide misprision into two kinds, negative or positive….

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The Internet Archive is partnering with the Council of State Archivists (CoSA) and Society of American Archivists (SAA) at the:

Archive-It’s 2016 Partner Meeting, Tuesday, August 2, 2016, in Atlanta, Georgia

Previous OLR blog post about the Internet Archive.

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The Equal Justice Library is now located at the Georgetown Law School Library:

The National Equal Justice Library (NEJL) is the first and only institution dedicated to documenting and preserving the legal profession’s history of providing counsel for those unable to afford it….” [Link to National Equal Justice Library homepage.]

Their collection includes oral histories, like this one about the early history of the Legal Services Corporation in Arkansas:

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The Oregonian / OregonLive published these two articles:

“Oregon Innocence Project misses mark in notorious murder (OPINION),” by John Foote, March 29, 2016, Clackamas County District Attorney. (Internet Archive copy.)

“Why Oregon Innocence Project has raised questions about notorious murder case (OPINION),” by Steve Wax, April 5, 2016, Legal Director of Oregon Innocence Project, a program of Oregon Justice Resource Center. (Internet Archive copy.)

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The Prime Minister of Iceland is most likely only the first “casualty” in the Panama Papers whistleblowing (or leak) and investigative reporting saga.

Read The Guardian article: “Why the Panama Papers should be a US election issue,” by Trevor Timm, 4/5/16.

Tracking “Panama-Gate“: Whether it’s Ponzi, Watergate, S&L Crisis, Iran-Contra, Madoff, the Big Short (see whole Michael Lewis oeuvre), and other 1% scandals too numerous to mention (including our recent Bank of Oswegao scandal), we now have The Panama Papers, brought to us this time by Mossack Fonseca, one of the thousands of law firms and companies that provide similar services.

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From the Law Librarian Blog (2): SCOTUS Style Manual Available for Purchase

Excerpt: “In Supreme Court’s Style Manual is Private No More, Tony Mauro reports that the US Supreme Court Style Guide, 2013 ed. can be purchased through Amazon without Court approval because a court aficionado named Jack Metzler is making it available for sale under his own imprint. Metzler reportedly photocopied the 200+ page long manual in the Supreme Court’s law library….” [Link to full LLB2 blog post.]

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Citing law back to Wheaton v. Peters, 33 U.S. (8 Pet.) 591 (1834), “Fastcase maintains that public law cannot be copyrighted ….” [Quoted from Ambrogi, Feb. 6, 2016, article.]

Wheaton v. Peters (read the case at Justia, via Wikipedia, or search the case name for other caselaw sources, e.g. Google Scholar or Cornell LII)

Track Fastcase v. Casemaker news developments at Law Sites Blog and other legal news sources:

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OREGON’S FINAL PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY LIST RELEASED BY SECRETARY ATKINS

Voters have until April 26th to decide to participate in a major party primary.” [Link to Secretary of State’s media release.]

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When you need legal research advice, turn to the legal research experts, professional law librarians, most of whom are able to share their expertise freely, or low-costly (so to speak), which is good value indeed when you need accurate, timely, and comprehensive information.

Great law librarians keep up with the vast world of legal research resources: dozens, hundreds, and even thousands of journals and websites and lawyer and law librarian listserves, networks, and professional associations (e.g. AALL). A Law Librarian’s Continuing Education also includes reading local, state, and national judicial, legislative, and regulatory news, and related news in the foreign and international legal world.

So, make sure the librarian you consult for legal research advice is Keeping Up With the Legal Research Joneses or, more to the point, Keeping Up With Opposing Counsel, whose access to legal research resources might be funded a whole lot better than yours: