Law Practice: Ethical Duty of Technology Competence

“13 States Have Adopted Ethical Duty of Technology Competence,” by Robert Ambrogi, 3/16/15:

“In 2012, something happened that I called a sea change in the legal profession: The American Bar Association formally approved a change to the Model Rules of Professional Conduct to make clear that lawyers have a duty to be competent not only in the law and its practice, but also in technology….” [Link to full blog post.]

When to Talk to a Lawyer? BEFORE You Respond to that Summons or Demand Letter!

Please do not be penny wise, pound foolish. Please! Public law librarians see these 2 things every day, day after day, week after week, month after ….:

1) Unrepresented litigants who have an expensive legal mess to clean up (IF it can be cleaned up) because they thought legal self-representation, without ever consulting a lawyer at all, was a good idea.

2) Lawyers who are, at great expense, representing people who thought the law was “all online” or DIY. It’s not, no matter what anyone tries to tell you.

Don’t risk losing you money, your credit rating, your home, your inheritance, or anything else you value.

Read this from a lawyer’s point of view:

“The ONLY advice I give away: If you get served with a demand from a lawyer or a summons from a court, CALL A REAL LAWYER”

The Oregon State Bar Information and Referral Service has a toll free number to call to get names of attorneys in your area; call their referral service at 503-684-3763 or 1-800-452-7636. More information about their services is available at their website.

Why Do Solos and Small Law Firms Bear the Burden of Access to Justice?

Read this interesting blog post and discussion (in the Comments).

Future Fridays: Hey, ABA – Why Do Solos and Smalls Bear the Burden of Access to Justice? By Carolyn Elefant, at MyShingle, November 7, 2014.

And this one:

“Lawyer Can’t Work on The Cheap Even If He Wants To,” by Carolyn Elefant, February 13, 2015.

Lawyers and Telephones: Don’t Lose that Client!

There are lots of reasons people don’t like lawyers, which doesn’t help either side, but it shouldn’t be because the lawyer doesn’t know how to manage incoming calls:

From the always practical and interesting, Jim Calloway’s Law Practice Tips:

“New Client Inquiry on Line One”

Oregon Sheriff’s Association Civil Process Manual, $350

Oregon State Sheriffs’ 2014 Civil Process Manual:

You can sometimes find this in your county law library.

Any attorney seeking to expand his or her knowledge working on matters involving civil process will benefit from this informative seventeen chapter civil process manual.

The Oregon State Sheriffs’ 2014 Civil Process Manual features topics of interest, including service and enforcement of various types of process, whether it be notice or enforcement process, effective service of orders, enforcement of pre-judgment and post-judgment remedies

  • Execution: The manual discusses the most current methods of executing on personal and real property based on a monetary judgment or a judgment of foreclosure.
  • Garnishment: Garnishment of financial institutions, individual companies, multiple debtors, and other issues
  • Process: Issuance of process, including writs of execution and writs of garnishment in justice courts or municipal courts – Registering judgments entered in lower courts
  • County Clerk Lien Record: The role of the Clerk County Lien Record on the enforcement of judgments and support orders
  • Writs/Orders of Assistance: Enforcement of writs of assistance and orders of assistance for the recovery of children
  • Enforcement of abuse restraining orders and stalking orders
  • Landlord/Tenant Actions
  • Concealed Handgun License chapter

No Death Goals (Volvo) and Access to Justice?

“Could Volvo’s No Death Goal Show The Way for Access to Justice Innovation,” February 1, 2015 by Richard Zorza

I recently discovered that Volvo Cars has set a zero death goal for its new cars by 2020.

Our vision is that no one is killed or injured in a new Volvo by 2020,” the chief of governmental affairs is reported to have sad. Whether or not they actually achieve the specifics of that goal is less important than the fact that by setting such a goal, and doing so publicly, they change their whole system from thinking day to day, or year to year, to where they really want to be. (More on the vision here.) Interestingly, it turns out that a bit less than 20 years ago Sweden set as a goal that “Nobody should be killed or seriously injured within the road transport system” so this is also an example of corporate culture following governmental policy.

So the obvious question is this: What similar realistic, but challenging goals could we set for access to justice — goals that would require long term strategic thinking, and that recognize that system problems require systemic solutions. Different organizations should set such component goals for themselves….’ [Link to full blog post.]

Related, and equally interesting, blog post from Robert Ambrogi’s LawSites, January 19, 2015:

“Debating The Pros and Cons of Non-lawyers Practicing Law,”

CLEs for Oregon Solo and Small Firm Practitioners: Legal Lunchbox Series

The OSB Sole and Small Firm Practitioners’ Section executive committee is starting a series of free or low-cost (for non-SSFP members) CLEs that may be of interest to solos or small firm practitioners. The series starts Wednesday, January 21, 2015, and are free to OSB SSFP Section members. Please visit the OSB SSFP website for more information or the SSFP Section website (under construction) for additional contact information.

THE LEGAL LUNCHBOX SERIES

The Sole and Small Firm Practitioners Section of the OSB is pleased to invite all members to attend a series of free seminars/CLEs, to be held from 12:00 p.m. -1:00 pm on the third Wednesday of each month. You can participate via webcast, but members in the Portland area are encouraged to bring your lunch and meet your colleagues at Kafoury and McDougal, who have graciously provided their conference room for our series:

January 21, 2015: Business Planning for Solos and Small Firms – presented by Scott Schnuck
February 18, 2015: Privacy 101 – presented by Lauren Wallace
March 18, 2015: Elder Abuse Issues for Solos and Small Firms – Victoria Blachly and Ellen Klem
April 15, 2015: Before You Hire Your First (or Next) Employee – presented by Elizabeth Inayoshi
May 20, 2015: Lawyers and the ADA – presented by Dennis Steinman

 

 

From Westlaw to CardMunch

Bob Ambrogi’s LawSites is always interesting and he travels the same roads all legal researchers do: legal research, law libraries, law practice management, solo and small law firm practioners, big law, etc.

His list of “Most Popular Posts (Published Any Year)” is interesting and humorous, especially the: Top 4 from Any Year:

What Do You Pay for Westlaw or LexisNexis? (July 13, 2011).
How to Find if an Attorney Has Been Disciplined (July 7, 2010).
Problems with Adobe Acrobat X Pro (Jan. 21, 2011).
Has LinkedIn Abandoned CardMunch? (Dec. 23, 2013)”

(Our own top blog posts remain constant, i.e. anything we post about when, where, and how to leave kids home alone. Yikes.)