Oregon Lawyers: What is an “of Counsel” Relationship?

From the PLF Law Practice Management blog: “I Say Of Counsel You Say …” (posted 10/13/2014)

Of Counsel relationships remain a strong area of interest for lawyers who are drawn to the idea of creating a professional affiliation. In that quest, there are many misunderstandings about what an of counsel relationship is ….” [Link to LPM blog post.]

“Oregon Statutory Time Limitations” 2014 Edition (BarBooks)

The 2014 edition of Oregon Statutory Time Limitations is available on BarBooks.

Oregon lawyers have access through the bar association and others through the county law libraries that subscribe to BarBooks.

(In the past one could purchase a print copy of this book. We don’t know yet if this one will be available in print or digital format for purchase and use outside of BarBooks.)

Mandatory eFiling for Oregon Attorneys, December 1, 2014

Excerpt from the CJ announcement (link from Oregon LPM blog):

Mandatory eFiling Plan for Attorneys Filing in Oregon State Courts

Chief Justice Thomas A. Balmer, Oregon Supreme Court, has approved a plan for the move to a mandatory eFiling requirement for attorneys filing as es in Oregon’s circuit and appellate courts. The Oregon Judicial department will circulate proposed court rules in the upcoming months for comment. he plan calls for a mandatory date of December 1, 2014 for the eleven circuit courts that currently have the Oregon eCourt system, including the filing component (File and Serve), and includes a transition plan for those courts that implement later….” [Link to Law Practice Management blog post.]

Pronoun Puzzles: “He said, She said” in Oregon Legal Documents

“He said, she said,” by Ian Pisarcik, Legal Publications Attorney Editor

Excerpt: “One of my favorite cartoons depicts a young female student standing next to a tall male teacher. Both are staring at a chalkboard. The chalkboard reads: Stone Age Man, Bronze Age Man, and Iron Age Man. The speech bubble extending from the young girls mouth asks: “Did they have women in those days?”

“Gender-neutral language is achieved by avoiding the use of ‘gendered generics‘ (male or female nouns and pronouns used to refer to both men and women).” This is easier said than done. But so is carrying a tune, and that doesn’t stop nine out of ten I-5 drivers from pulling their lips back and pretending they’re Mick Jagger….” [Link to full OSB Legal Pubs He said/She said blog post.]