Articles Tagged with MOOCS

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“Understanding the MOOC moment, by Prof. Randal Picker (guest-blogging) July 10 at Volokh Conspiracy. (Professor Picker’s website, or maybe this website.)

Excerpt:

Next Monday, I am launching a new free online course, Internet Giants: The Law and Economics of Media Platforms. In it, we will wrestle with questions relating to Microsoft, Google, Apple, Amazon and the other great companies that define the online platforms we spend so much time with. These companies are involved in important antitrust, copyright and patent cases, both in the United States and Europe, but around the world generally.

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Link to details from Gallagher Blogs: “Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, and Disadvantage—Free Online Course”

Stephen Bright is president and senior counsel at the Southern Center for Human Rights, a public interest law program that deals with human rights in the criminal justice and prison systems….

This course examines issues of poverty and race in the criminal justice system, particularly with regard to the imposition of the death penalty…. There are 40 videos, ranging from 18 to 45 minutes…. that’s a lot of instruction from one of the nation’s leading authorities on the death penalty….” [Link to blog post.]

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Expertise needed by 21st Century Library Managers: Money, Privacy, Copyright, Licensing, and Education Law … that is, the same skills professional librarians needed in the 20th and 19th centuries!

But user, funder, and governing body assumptions and expectations of what libraries can be and knowledge of how libraries are managed have changed:

“Libraries in the Time of MOOCs,” by Curtis Kendrick and Irene Gashurov, in Educause, Monday, November 4, 2013

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Do you have what it takes not only to enjoy law school classes, but not to fall asleep when you hear someone talk about indebitatus assumptsit, a conditional devise, malum in se, expiation, scienter, asportation, or chattel paper?
(It gets worse: You have to read statutes drafted by legislators and decisions written by judges. Torture, indeed, unless of course you are a budding Clarence Darrow or David Boies.)
If you want to learn a little about the law, try some free online seminars, from: