Articles Tagged with Surveys of state laws

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“State Legal Information Census: An Analysis of Primary State Legal Information,” by Sarah Glassmeyer, Published on February 21, 2016.

Sarah Glassmeyer, is a Research Fellow with the Harvard Library Innovation Lab, Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

Excerpt: “.… Findings indicate that there exist at least 14 barriers to accessing legal information. These barriers exist for both the individual user of a resource for personal research as well as an institutional user that would seek to republish or transform the information. Details about the types of barriers and the quantity of their existence can be found under “Barriers to Access.” At the time of the census, no state provided barrier-free access to their legal information….” [Link to full LLRX article.]

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We are a country of federal, state, and local laws (and international treaties, for that matter). So when someone asks, “What’s the Law On …,” law librarians and lawyers need to show laypeople how to Find the Law(s).

NPR has done that for you with Body Cam Laws (but, note that laws change so you will need to update this research each time you need accurate data.)

“Piecing Together America’s Patchwork Quilt Of Body Cam Laws,” posted 2/25/16, at NPR’s All Tech Considered.

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LLRX dot com is still a fabulous legal research resource:

State Legal Information Census: An Analysis of Primary State Legal Information

And if you can’t get enough of law librarians’ legal research blogs, Justia still has the best round-up, at their blawgsearch website.

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Look for the 7th edition of this important legal research resource, National Survey of State Laws, which is used by lawyers and many other legal researchers. Visit the Hein Blog for a July 8, 2015, guest post by the author, Richard Leiter.

Link to my 2014 blog post on this topic: How to Find State Law Comparisons, Surveys, and Compilations