Articles Tagged with Criminal procedure

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We are all immigrants (except of course for Native Americans, and maybe even they too were immigrants thousands of years ago):

BBC News: Larry Nassar case: Who is Judge Rosemarie Aquilina? (1/24/18)

The judge who has sentenced disgraced USA gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar has given a voice to over 150 women who chose to confront their abuser face-to-face….

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Nation book review: Why Does Our Justice System Fight So Hard to Keep Innocent People Behind Bars? Mark Godsey was a “prosecutor’s prosecutor” who didn’t think there were any innocent people in prison. Then he began supervising his law school’s Innocence Project, and realized his assumptions were all wrong” by Joshua Holland, in The Nation, January 24, 2018:

Excerpt:

“In the criminal-justice system romanticized by Hollywood films, those convicted of crimes are generally guilty. And a protagonist need only prove that someone’s been wrongly imprisoned to get them freed by a judiciary that values truth and justice….

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It’s not an insult, although it could be.

I ran across the word in a recent Christopher Fowler Bryant and May novel (this one was Wild Chamber, but they are all excellent! – each one different, each one fall over funny, dark, wise, and each will make you say, “you too!” when you read/hear Fowler gently poke a stick at the ridiculous, the incomprehensible, the rubbish-talkers) and looked up the word “quango.” Good word, isn’t it, you quango, you.

Anyway, it’s an acronym (which can be distinguished from an abbreviation, in case you thought the two were synonyms – they are not (and for extra credit, the words amuse and bemuse are not synonyms either to the “strictly speaking” among us, although you can render someone bemused by using the two words interchangeably)).

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The Oregonian / OregonLive published these two articles:

“Oregon Innocence Project misses mark in notorious murder (OPINION),” by John Foote, March 29, 2016, Clackamas County District Attorney. (Internet Archive copy.)

“Why Oregon Innocence Project has raised questions about notorious murder case (OPINION),” by Steve Wax, April 5, 2016, Legal Director of Oregon Innocence Project, a program of Oregon Justice Resource Center. (Internet Archive copy.)

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We are a country of federal, state, and local laws (and international treaties, for that matter). So when someone asks, “What’s the Law On …,” law librarians and lawyers need to show laypeople how to Find the Law(s).

NPR has done that for you with Body Cam Laws (but, note that laws change so you will need to update this research each time you need accurate data.)

“Piecing Together America’s Patchwork Quilt Of Body Cam Laws,” posted 2/25/16, at NPR’s All Tech Considered.

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The Oregon Innocence Project is presenting this CLE, scheduled for Feb. 5, 2016:

Continuing Debate Over the Sequential Lineup

Presented by Oregon Innocence Project and featuring Professor Daniel Reisberg.

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OIP Event: This is Innocence: May 15, 2015, at Mercy Corp Action Center (Portland).

Guest speaker Jennifer Thompson, a rape victim who wrongly identified her attacker and sent the wrong person to prison. “DNA later freed that man, Ronald Cotton, and the two wrote a book together about the unreliability of eyewitness identification and the beauty in forgiveness called Picking Cotton.

Also speaking will be Rep. Jennifer Williamson from House Dist. 36 and Steve Wax, OIP’s Legal Director