Articles Tagged with vehicle and traffic law

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Relating to operating a motor vehicle while using a mobile communication device; creating new provisions; and amending ORS 811.507:
“A person commits the offense of operating a motor vehicle while using a mobile communication device if the person, while operating a motor vehicle on a highway, uses a mobile communication device…. The offense described in this section, operating a motor vehicle while using a mobile communication device, is a Class D traffic violation.”

House Bill 3186 (Chapter 530, (2011 Laws): Effective date January 1, 2012),

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The law library has a new legal research guide on Oregon vehicle and traffic laws.  So, if you have a traffic ticket, or just want to learn where to find out about those weird flashing green left turn arrows, check out the new guide on the Subject Guides page of our website.  If you’re trying to find a document on our website but aren’t sure where it is, check the Document Index, where we’ve uploaded every document that appears on our site.

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I was looking at the 2011 OJD Base Fines Instructions and Charts and the 8 x 10 color glossies with circles and arrows and the word U-TURNS caught my eye.
Does anyone follow this law – anyone who hasn’t been dinged by it?
2009 ORS 811.365 (check for current ORS and any interim session laws if necessary):
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OPB’s Think Out Loud radio program had a recent show on Pedestrian Law: Nov. 1, 2010, Foot Traffic and guests included Ray Thomas who wrote Oregon Pedestrian Rights: A Guide to People on Foot.

Read more about loopy, oblivious, clueless, narcissistic, aggressive, flaky, indifferent, silly, stupid, and distracted pedestrians, drivers, and bicyclists at the Foot Traffic program Comments section and at my previous OLR blog pedestrian law posts.

“Let’s be careful out there!”

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(If you are reading this in 2011, or later, make sure the statute has not been amended or repealed.)

The text of 2009 ORS 153.058 Initiation of violation proceeding by private party:

“(1) A person other than an enforcement officer may commence a violation proceeding by filing a complaint with a court that has jurisdiction over the alleged violation. The filing of the complaint is subject to ORS 153.048. The complaint shall be entered by the court in the court record.

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There are excellent consumer law websites all over the web, but sometimes you just need the local touch and a local story. This is because a lot of consumer law is local, that is, you need to know state and local law, practice, and procedure in order to determine your rights.

I love this story – and it is so familiar to a public law librarian: many, many people come into the law library to ask, “Where and How Do I Appeal?”

Complete answers to questions people ask are often as elusive as it almost was here for Laura Gunderson – and kudos to her for persistent research, which is often exactly what one has to do – persist, persist, persist. But you can see why legal solutions so often elude those without the aptitute, resources, and time to pursue fairness, if not justice.

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Another story (see the 4/16/10 one about the erroneous safety corridor designation) about a driver who does the research – and finds out that posted speed limit has been wrong since 1980.

Oregonian story: “Driver fights her way out of Milwaukie speed trap”, April 18, 2010:

Excerpt: “…Miles said she couldn’t believe she was going much faster than 35 mph, and she was right. The citation said she was doing 37. But what really caught her eye was the posted speed listed on the ticket — 25 mph. Miles had never noticed that the stretch of King Road between 44th and 53rd avenues was posted as 25 mph.

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What if you get a traffic ticket and it’s based on the police officer’s wrong assumption about the law?

It never hurts to do a little legal research, and in this case, the homework was to make sure everyone got their facts straight: the statute AND the validity of the alleged “safety corridor designation.”

The Oregonian story: “Inflated traffic fines in unofficial safety corridor in Portland may yield refunds,” by Joseph Rose, The Oregonian, April 13, 2010