Articles Posted in Legal Subject Area Guides

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The Equal Justice Library is now located at the Georgetown Law School Library:

The National Equal Justice Library (NEJL) is the first and only institution dedicated to documenting and preserving the legal profession’s history of providing counsel for those unable to afford it….” [Link to National Equal Justice Library homepage.]

Their collection includes oral histories, like this one about the early history of the Legal Services Corporation in Arkansas:

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The Oregonian / OregonLive published these two articles:

“Oregon Innocence Project misses mark in notorious murder (OPINION),” by John Foote, March 29, 2016, Clackamas County District Attorney. (Internet Archive copy.)

“Why Oregon Innocence Project has raised questions about notorious murder case (OPINION),” by Steve Wax, April 5, 2016, Legal Director of Oregon Innocence Project, a program of Oregon Justice Resource Center. (Internet Archive copy.)

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We are a country of federal, state, and local laws (and international treaties, for that matter). So when someone asks, “What’s the Law On …,” law librarians and lawyers need to show laypeople how to Find the Law(s).

NPR has done that for you with Body Cam Laws (but, note that laws change so you will need to update this research each time you need accurate data.)

“Piecing Together America’s Patchwork Quilt Of Body Cam Laws,” posted 2/25/16, at NPR’s All Tech Considered.

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LLRX dot com is still a fabulous legal research resource:

State Legal Information Census: An Analysis of Primary State Legal Information

And if you can’t get enough of law librarians’ legal research blogs, Justia still has the best round-up, at their blawgsearch website.

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You can read a hundred articles about wolves and their prey, including the ODFW Wolf webpages, but not a single one will explain exactly WHY wolves are, or were, on endangered species lists.

If you look hard enough you really can find hundreds of articles on the WHY, but here is an interesting one that sums up the complexity of the issue:

Scientific American: “Can Wolves Bring Back Wilderness? [Excerpt]: People may find it hard to adapt to an ecology of predation and fear,” by Jason Mark on October 9, 2015:

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When Oregon Laws are codified*, they can be scattered all over their corresponding legislative subject compilation, the Oregon Revised Statutes, so, unless you are a researcher with too much time on your hands, I recommend you start with one of the following resources until you become very familiar with all the new cannabis laws, statutes AND regulations – and there will be new cannabis laws until you die or until the world’s lights go out, whichever comes first:

1) Oregon Revised Statutes (ORS): the 2015 ORS, which has not yet been posted online, will be the first ORS with codified recreational cannabis statutes. Toss the word “cannabis” into the ORS search box. You might want to toss in the word “marijuana” just to make sure you didn’t miss anything.

2) Laws & Regs from OHA: Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP), which links to their OMMP Administrative Rules, Statutes and Legal Information webpage.

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Whether you donate money or in-kind to a charity or nonprofit directly (through their website, in cash, or by check), through “fraudsters” (the FTC  word), or through donation clearinghouses like Willamette Week’s Give Guide or the Oregonian’s Season of Sharing ….

Make Sure Your Donation is Doing What You Want it to Do – and learn a little about the nonprofit and fundraising world while you’re at it:

The Oregon Department of Justice Charitable Activities website is a good place to begin your research. Find these topics and more:

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Six hours is barely enough time to teach Legislative History 101, but you can still join in the (admittedly wonkish) fun on October 23rd, 2015:

Oregon Legislative History: Research and Time Management Tips from the Experts”

Legislators, lawyers, law students, paralegals, librarians and other legal researchers are welcome to attend or purchase the course materials.

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The Association for Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies (ASCLA) offers these, and other, courses for library employees:

Going to Jail: How Juvenile Books Portray the Prison Experience:

“This five week course will explore portrayals of the incarceration experience in juvenile and young adult literature. Participants will be assigned to read several books written for young people that include scenes in prison or juvenile detention facilities….

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The Media Release, “Oregon Courts Make It Easier to Complete Documents in Domestic Violence Restraining Order Cases,” can be found from OJD Media Releases, What’s New (for 1/15/15).

If you have trouble reaching the actual online FAPA service from the URL in the Media Release, it’s not you (there’s a rogue www in the URL), so go to the OJD Restraining Orders – Family Abuse Prevention Act (FAPA) webpage and look for the “Use Online Question-and-Answer Interview based eForms” link.

It doesn’t say so clearly, but you will likely need to create an account so be prepared to create a user-name and password. This feature enables you to return to your form later to complete or correct it.