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Did you know there was a Project on Predatory Student Lending? This one is at the Harvard Law School Legal Services Center.

And don’t forget about the federal Consumer Financial Protection Board (at least for the next few days) and your state’s consumer law resources at the Department of Justice or maybe other departments. Your own state’s legal services organizations and your own school’s legal services office may also have free information and legal assistance for you.

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Visit the Oregon Legislature’s website for more information about the 2017 Session:

“Organizational Days will run January 9th through the 11th. During Organizational Days, Members-elect are sworn in as legislators and bills are introduced. The 79th Legislative Assembly will convene on Wednesday, February 1….” [Link to Oregon Legislature’s website.]

You can link to the Find Your District and Legislators page from that homepage.

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A country’s financial health, among other measures, depends a lot on views of how corrupt its political and financial leaders and systems are rated. (E.g. would you invest in a country where corruption is high, where you can’t record officially and protect in the country’s courts your financial and real estate investments, where corporate and government employees are “on the take,” etc?)

Here are some Corruption Ranking sources of information:

Transparency International (or select an individual country) and read their “What is (and Costs of) corruption” pages. And the Wikipedia page.

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Portland’s Street Roots newspaper has some terrific reporting on a wide variety of topics. This article is from a November 2016 issue; you can find other articles at their website.

This is not, however, to discourage those of you lucky enough to be able to buy a print Street Roots from their vendors!

Dishonorable: The trouble with Oregon’s judicial elections, by Emily Green, 3 Nov 2016 Street Roots:

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The Legal Research is Easy blog post, Hone Those Research Skills, is California-based, but the lessons it teaches apply to law students in every state where public law libraries are supported. Be a good money manager, and get smart: seek out free and cheap legal research resources, human, print, and digital:

Excerpt:

A while back, I read an article in the Los Angeles Daily Journal (Bar proposes revised practical skills requirements) by Lyle Moran that caught my eye. Apparently, the California Bar Association wants to include 10 hours of “practical” legal instruction while law students are still in school. While the article did not say what specific skills the Bar want’s new attorneys to focus, might I offer a suggestion? Might I propose that in that 10 hour mix, law students spend at least three (3) hours at their local county law library to see what exactly their local county law library has to offer.

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Oregon author: “Death: An Oral History,” a book by Casey Jarman:

Publisher Comments:
In this illuminating collection of oral-history style interviews, Casey Jarman talks to a funeral industry watchdog about the (often shady) history of the death trade; he hears how songwriter David Bazan lost his faith while trying to hold on to his family; he learns about cartoonist Art Spiegelman using his college LSD trips to explain death to his children; and he gets to know his own grandparents, posthumously. These are stories of loss, rebuilding, wonder, and wild speculation featuring everyone from philosophers to former death row wardens and hospice volunteers. In these moving, enlightening, and often funny conversations, the end is only the beginning….” [Link to publisher’s website.]

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Radio doesn’t get any better than BBC’s World Service program Outlook. Listen to the “The Reluctant Death Row Executioner” episode as Frank Thompson, formerly in charge of the Oregon State Penitentiary, speaks to BBC’s Matthew Banister, about what executions do to the people who have to plan, drill, and carry out those executions.

And listen to other BBC Outlook programs, which are nothing short of inspirational, as are the BBC’s Fifth Floor program episodes.

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It’s not new news that most U.S.-born American citizens who’ve been through and even graduated from our educational institutions could not pass the Naturalization Test with anything close to barely-passing scores on the first try – so is this story any surprise?

Teaching Students That Judge Judy Is Not a Supreme Court Justice, by Elizabeth A. Harris, New York Times, Nov. 9, 2016

We all aim to do a better job learning about our country’s and the world’s history and laws and maybe also support, volunteer for, or participate in Oregon’s Classroom Law Project and others like it around the country. Maybe the next generations will do better – at least we can hope they will try.

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Still wondering about the jury verdict in the Bundy et al Malheur Militia case? This Oregonian article explains a lot. (You’ll  need to do some more homework to explain it all – or most of it, including, among other things, learning about sentencing guidelines and the (former) Oregon U.S. Attorney decision to appeal an Oregon federal district court judge’s sentencing decision.)

Never underestimate, or second guess, a jury until you stand in their shoes – or sit in their chairs:

“Who was John Killman? A tip and detective work unmask mystery man at Oregon refuge,” by Maxine Bernstein, [print] Oregonian, Sunday, November 6, 2016.