Articles Tagged with Access to justice

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We can “vote” 365 days of the year, not just on election days, at least as long as our U.S. Constitution remains intact:

Every Day is “Call Government Switchboard Day” or “Talk to Your Elected Representatives Day”:

Congress (use this one for contact info and this one for Congressional activities and documents), or:

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The Self-Represented Litigation Network (SRLN) is an organization for Access-to-Justice (A2J) professionals, lawyers, judges, law librarians, law professors, law students, and others who believe that everyone has a right to free or affordable legal assistance and access to courts.

The “2017 SRLN Conference will be held February 23 -24, 2017 at the California Judicial Council building in San Francisco.

The Self-Represented Litigation Network (SRLN) is “establishing a permanent Conferences Committee as part of the Strategy and Outreach Working Group….” Locate SRLN members where you work to find out how you can contribute.

 

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Read the ABA article and the report:

“Can the access-to-justice gap be closed? These recommendations might make it possible,” by Victor Li and James Podgers, ABA Journal, August 06, 2016.

And read Bob Ambrogi’s comments on the report, at his LawSites Blog post:

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There is no shortage of news about SRL (self-represented litigant) service resources, here in Oregon and beyond. Two recent stories and a list of SRL service provider resources:

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Oregon Access to Justice Forum, September 2016:

The Multnomah Bar Association (MBA) has this event on its calendar and you can link to more information and registration from the Oregon Campaign for Equal Justice website and this event’s Registration site.

Access to Justice Forum/Advisory Committee Meeting

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Massachusetts has Guidelines on the Public Rights of Access to Judicial Proceedings and Records.

This seems to be a relevant post for us here at the Oregon Legal Research Blog given the most recent statewide and local Oregon difficulties (to put it mildly) public officials are having with the true meaning and spirit of our Public Records Laws.  (And remember the 2006 Multnomah County Auditor’s report on eliminating barriers to access to public records? There are many more of those, er, aspirational public records proclamations, where that came from, local and statewide. Sigh.) (By the way, Auditor or “accountability” reports at many levels of government are a great research resource.)

These particular Massachusetts’ guidelines start off with this statement of their:

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“State Legal Information Census: An Analysis of Primary State Legal Information,” by Sarah Glassmeyer, Published on February 21, 2016.

Sarah Glassmeyer, is a Research Fellow with the Harvard Library Innovation Lab, Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

Excerpt: “.… Findings indicate that there exist at least 14 barriers to accessing legal information. These barriers exist for both the individual user of a resource for personal research as well as an institutional user that would seek to republish or transform the information. Details about the types of barriers and the quantity of their existence can be found under “Barriers to Access.” At the time of the census, no state provided barrier-free access to their legal information….” [Link to full LLRX article.]

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The Equal Justice Library is now located at the Georgetown Law School Library:

The National Equal Justice Library (NEJL) is the first and only institution dedicated to documenting and preserving the legal profession’s history of providing counsel for those unable to afford it….” [Link to National Equal Justice Library homepage.]

Their collection includes oral histories, like this one about the early history of the Legal Services Corporation in Arkansas: