Articles Posted in State Government & Legal Resources

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You must register to vote by Tuesday, April 24th, 2018, if you want to vote in the Oregon primary.

View the 2018 Election Timeline (PDF) at the Oregon Secretary of State’s Election Division website. (If the link to the Timeline PDF fails, link to the Election Division’s URL and search there.)

If you like to calculate your own election registration deadline:

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The Multnomah County Library has a webpage with information on how to find vital records in Oregon. If you are seeking vital records stored locally, check with your own public library’s website or your local city, county, or court clerk offices.

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“The 79th Legislative Assembly will convene, Monday, February 5, 2018. Legislative session is defined as a period of time in which the Legislative Assembly officially convenes for the purpose of lawmaking….”[Link to Oregon Legislature’s website for updates.]

This will be the short session, i.e. 35 days.

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Does your state have a Right to Repair law? (I didn’t know either!)

But our very own Free Geek (in Portland, Oregon), in addition to all the other excellent work they do, testifies before state legislatures in favor of right to repair laws; for more information they link website visitors to:

Repair dot Org:

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State laws that govern Oregon political parties. (Federal law also governs political party campaign finance and related activities, but that is a subject for bloggers and scholars more educated and intrepid than I.)

1) Oregon Constitution (Oregon Blue Book)

Important note: You can also link to the Oregon Constitution from the Legislature’s website, but please make sure you are looking at the most recent version. Remember that the official, full version of the Oregon Revised Statutes (ORS), including any Oregon Constitutional amendments, is updated only at the end of the long-session year. For example, the 2017 Oregon legislative session ended in July 2017, but the 2017 ORS will not be published online or in print until early 2018. It will include all legislation in force through 2017, from regular and special sessions and any Constitutional or citizen measures approved by voters. (You can still read the laws that were passed in “Oregon Laws,” which is where the session laws are published. Where you find those online probably deserves its own blog post.)

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Political parties are governed by federal, state, and local laws, but more to the point, they are controlled by their own party rules, bylaws, and traditions.

State and County political parties generally post their bylaws, rules, resolutions, and platforms on their websites.

The Oregon Blue Book section National, International and Tribal is a good place to start your research; it will link to statewide political party websites. Those websites will in turn link to local political party websites:

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After 10+ years of blogging about how to find Oregon law, statutes, regulations, cases, etc., it seems as though it’s time to pull back the curtain a little more and write about political party laws and operations.

Information about sources of existing Oregon political party laws and tips about how to find answers to your political party questions will be included.

I’m learning along with you so feel free to send along corrections and updates.

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You can’t (CANNOT) waltz into an Oregon Small Claims Court and expect to win your case. You have to do your homework:

1) You have to read the book (in public and law libraries and bookstores):

“Using Small Claims Court in Oregon.” by Janay Haas, 2012. (Oregon Legal Guides)

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Article, from the Oregon State Bar Litigation Section, June/July 2017:

Judge’s Corner:

“Use of Fictitious Names for Parties in Civil Litigation in Oregon,” by The Honorable James Hargreaves (Senior Judge, retired), Lane County Circuit Court (June/July 2017):

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The American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) awarded their 2017 Public Access to Government Information (PAGI) Award to Laura Orr, the former Washington County Law Librarian (2002-2015).

AALL Press Release, excerpt:

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW LIBRARIES ANNOUNCES 2017 PUBLIC ACCESS TO GOVERNMENT INFORMATION AWARD WINNER