Articles Tagged with Digital information

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State Library of Oregon Digital Collections include Oregon Government Publications, Oregoniana, and much more.

From the State Library: “We are happy to announce the debut of our new digital collections platform! Using Islandora, with hosting and support from LYRASIS, we migrated all of our Oregon state government publications and added new digital content related to the state. This platform upgrade allows everyone to browse easily by agency, search full text, and access PDF files of publications.

Until this transition, the primary focus of our digital collections has been supporting government transparency and civic education by ensuring consistent and coordinated permanent public access to information published by Oregon state government. With a more flexible platform, we look forward to continuing our commitment to providing access to state government publications and expanding our digital collections to include Oregoniana, Oregon-related federal government publications, and more.

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Your digital photos, letters, books, articles, documents, messages, etc. have no existence unless you pay attention to their preservation – or without electricity, for that matter. (You can’t really hold Zeros and Ones, Nothingness if you will, in your hands, let alone bequeath Nothingness to your heirs without taking serious steps to preserve and authenticate the data.)

See, e.g. from Moritz Law Library at The Ohio State University for what PURLs are:

Research Tip: What is “Permanent” Online?

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The October print 2016 Consumer Reports article (online is dated 9/20/16) cites to Ten Minute Mail and 65 other ways to protect your online privacy:

“66 Ways to Protect Your Privacy Right Now,” by Consumer Reports, September 20, 2016

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From Washington University Libraries digital gateway: Documenting Ferguson is a digital repository that seeks to preserve and make accessible community- and media-generated, original content that was captured and created following the killing of 18-year-old, Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri on August 9, 2014. A freely available resource for students, scholars, teachers, and the greater community, Documenting Ferguson has the ultimate goal of providing diverse perspectives of the events surrounding the conflicts in Ferguson….” [Link to Documenting Ferguson website.]

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Surprise!: It depends…, but please do not make any assumptions that your kids will be able to view those documents or photos on your CDs (or DVDs) or other digital storage device.

From report [link to infoDocket post]: ‘But “there is no average, because there is no average disc.’

Hat tip to infoDocket.

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Excerpt: “Rotten World of Legal Citation,” July 31st, 2014 by sadavis:

In the past few years, the issue of link rot has become a growing concern in relation to broken links in legal citations, most notably in U.S. Supreme Court decisions. Two articles that discuss this problem in detail are:

1) Raizel Liebler & June Liebert, Something Rotten in the State of Legal Citation: The Life of a United States Supreme Court Citation Containing an Internet Link (1996-2010), 15 Yale J.L. & Tech. 273 (2013). Available at http://yjolt.org/sites/default/files/Something_Rotten_in_Legal_Citation.pdf (finding that 29% of websites cited in US Supreme Court opinions no longer worked);

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On October 24, 2014, Georgetown University Law Library in Washington, D.C. will host a symposium that explores the problem of link and reference rot:

“404/File Not Found: Link Rot, Legal Citation and Projects to Preserve Precedent”

Preliminary Agenda:

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If you write, and you want people to read what you write, now and in the future, take heed:
Librarians Rule (again)!  Yes we can weed or delete your magnum opus from library collections, but, more to the point, we have an even greater passion for preserving your legacy!