Articles Tagged with Self-help

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From Richard Zorza’s Access to Justice blog:

California Bar Explores Joining Movement for Non-Lawyer Practice

California, Washington, and New York are featured in this article on the movement to allow people who cannot afford attorneys “to receive low-cost guidance in simpler legal matters by qualified non-lawyers.”

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We’re pleased, and very excited, to announce that our new, collaborative, Oregon county law libraries Oregon Legal Research website went live last week.

And what a journey it has been, with the generous and nurturing (and pro bono!) support from the best friend public law librarians ever had, Justia. It’s been a long and interesting journey, which we’ll write up one day soon – and post to the website, but not until the journey is complete.

In addition to continuing work on the website, note that the new WordPress Oregon Legal Research Blog won’t go “live” until the current Blogger Oregon Legal Research blog is fully migrated to WordPress. We still have lots of librarian work to do on it (taxonomies, oh my), but again, we bow down willingly and gratefully to Justia‘s patient and skilled teaching and technical staff. They create miracles that make us look good, really, really good.

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Thinking about legal self help, access to justice, unbundled legal services?

Richard Zorza’s Access to Justice Blog has all kinds of intriguing posts and links, e.g.

1) “Lawyer Referral Services Are the Key Gateway to Unbundled Services and California Leads the Way,” 10/16/12.

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This is not a rhetorical or even a political question. It is a school assignment! Hurrah for teachers, especially those who try out their own assignments before handing them over to their students (and their students’ parents).

Librarians get to help answer students’ reference and research questions, public librarians more than law librarians, but we (Oregon law librarians, that is) also often have the opportunity and honor to pitch in to help students answer their law-related questions, especially when the question comes through L-net, the Oregon statewide online reference service. (Many states have one of these online reference services, in addition to email/IM reference services offered through individual libraries or library systems.)

So, how about that Abuse of Power and Constitutions assignment? It had a follow-up exercise too: “Give an example of a nation that is not a constitutional government.”