Articles Tagged with Style manuals

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From the Law Librarian Blog (2): SCOTUS Style Manual Available for Purchase

Excerpt: “In Supreme Court’s Style Manual is Private No More, Tony Mauro reports that the US Supreme Court Style Guide, 2013 ed. can be purchased through Amazon without Court approval because a court aficionado named Jack Metzler is making it available for sale under his own imprint. Metzler reportedly photocopied the 200+ page long manual in the Supreme Court’s law library….” [Link to full LLB2 blog post.]

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From HeinOnline:The Universal Citation Guide, 3rd ed. recognizes the current practices of legal researchers who often consult an electronic research tool without ever seeing a print volume of a reporter or code sitting on a library shelf.”

…. As states publish primary documents on their own web sites and researchers utilize a wide variety of options to access legal materials, it is necessary to have a universal system of citation that helps users locate information across all formats, platforms, and publishers….” [Link to HeinOnline blog post and order information.]

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From Gallagher Law Library blog: Chinese Legal Citation Guidelines:

‘”Citation Guidelines for Chinese Language Materials” is a handy guide created by UW Law School Ph.D. students …. [T]he new guidelines provide interpretations of Bluebook rules for Chinese legal citation, plus detailed examples showing good practices...”‘

Direct PDF link to the Chinese Legal Citation Guidelines

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There is a rumor that 18 Oregon Tax Reports (2013) may be the last official print edition of the official Oregon Tax Reports.

Oregon Tax Court decisions, from 1999 to the present, can be found online at the OJD website, however, the site includes the following disclaimer: “None of the documents found in this website are the official publications. Official publications of the Oregon Tax Court can be found in the ‘Oregon Tax Reports.

Note: The OJD Appellate Courts Style Manual doesn’t state specifically if one can cite to the Tax Court’s online edition of its opinions.

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1) For documents cited in Oregon court filings I recommend starting with the free, official, and online OJD Appellate Court Style Manual.

You can link to that PDF, but I prefer going through the live OJD Publications website to make sure I have the most current version (the print/PDF Style Manual says 2002, but it has been updated since then).

2) You sometimes, though rarely, need the Bluebook (Harvard et al). The Oregon Appellate Court Style Manual will tell you when you need to go to Bluebook.

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Librarians, like mathematicians, find humor in the oddest places, so unless you’re one of us, don’t expect to find this as funny as I did:

While catching up on the back-issue research tip wonders to be found in the excellent LLSDC Law Library Lights newsletters, I came upon this article:

“Beyond the Pale: Finding Your Way Back From a Citation Netherworld,” by John Cannan, in Law Library Lights, Summer 2010, pp. 14-15.

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The current edition of “The Bluebook: Uniform System of Citation,” is the 19th.
The editors come out with a new edition about once every five years, so a new edition will not be coming out any time soon.  But their website offers free updates between editions.
Law schools can subscribe to an electronic version, but the editors expect the print version will continue to be published.
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The following blog post got me to thinking that a legal citation lesson for non-attorneys might be a challenge worth attempting, though I surely won’t get it right the first time.

3 Geeks and a Law Blog: Bloomberg Law Gets Cited By A New Jersey Court… A First for “___ BL ___” (citing to United States v. Stuler, Civil Action No. 08-273, 2010 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 43338, 2010 BL 99422 (W.D. Pa. May 4, 2010))

Onward to Legal Citation for the Novice: