Articles Tagged with U.S. Supreme Court

Published on:

By

From the ABA Journal News: “How is ‘certiorari’ pronounced? Even Supreme Court justices disagree,” Jun 17, 2014, by Debra Cassens Weiss

Excerpt: “.... He listened to the U.S. Supreme Court’s oral arguments to learn the uniform pronunciation and instead found a six-way split of opinion, the National Law Journal reports. Black’s Law Dictionary also fails to settle the dispute, Duane writes in an article for Green Bag (PDF). It lists three pronunciations as acceptable….” [Link to full article.]

Published on:

By

When you rely on a judicial opinion to support your cause, which version of the case do you carry into court? This is the 21st century law librarian and bench-bar dilemma.

Even if you solve the authenticity and and copyright problems (and we’re nowhere near doing that), what are we going to do about the Supreme Court?

See, Final Word on U.S. Law Isn’t: Supreme Court Keeps Editing,” by Adam Liptak, May 24, 2014 (re the upcoming article, The (Non)Finality of Supreme Court Opinions,” by Richard J. Lazarus, 128 HARV. L. REV. ___ (forthcoming 2014)).

Published on:

By

Interested in following the U.S. Supreme Courts arguments in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Cases?

They plan to allow same-day audio of the oral arguments, so keep an eye on the Supreme Court’s website March 26-28, 2012.

Or, maybe you’d rather do a crossword puzzle? Gallagher blogs about: NPR’s Legal Crossword Puzzle

Published on:

By

Visit SCOTUS blog for a report and links: New Policy on Tapes Release

In Oregon, CD’s of the Oregon Supreme and Appellate Courts’ oral arguments are usually available the day after the hearing, depending on the bailiff’s work flow. To obtain a copy of the CD, contact OJD at 503-986-5553. The cost is $10 per argument (as of today). A form must be completed and payment is required in advance unless an attorney is requesting, in which case the attorney can be billed.

If you’re not an attorney, call and ask for specific instructions. Don’t try and find the information on the OJD website, unless you have a lot of time. There is a lot of information on the OJD website, but it’s difficult to find specific information. (All of us who work on websites know and understand the problem! We just have too much information to post for our customers, patrons, constituents, etc. and it seems not enough time to organize it all properly.) Sometimes THE TELEPHONE is your Best Friend!

Contact Information