Articles Tagged with traffic law

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Maybe you saw the recent New York Times Magazine Tip: “How to Make a Citizen’s Arrest,” by Malia Wollan, May 6, 2016. (Also in their “Crime and Criminals” library.)

Maybe you wondered about Oregon’s laws on citizen’s arrests?

Maybe you also wondered if Portland, Oregon, means business with its Vision Zero plan (zero traffic-related fatalities and serious injuries)?

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Do you know where the most pedestrian fatalities occur? What about those Crosswalk Laws?

Take the Look Before Crossing quiz.  It’s quick and fun and educational. What more can you want?!  If you live in Portland, take the quiz soon and win a free “I Break for People” bag.

Take the quiz with your children or your walking-buddies!

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There is nothing like a Parking dispute to bring out one’s inner monster, whether the metamorphosis takes place in a faculty meeting (or parking lot), a mall parking lot in December, or in front of one’s home & hearth. There is now a serious book on the subject.

For a parallel view on the Zen of Parking, and in a more humorous mode, read Calvin Trillin’s 2001 novel, “Tepper isn’t going out,” but for a more prosaic examination of Parking, here is the title of that new book:

“Politics of Parking: Rights, Identity, and Property,” by Sarah Marusek

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You can find links to Oregon cities’ biennial photo radar and red light reports from the Oregon State Library’s Reports to the Legislature website, including Beaverton, Sherwood, and many others.

Oregon Revised Statute (ORS) 810.438 was amended in 2005 to require cities using photo radar equipment to conduct a process and outcome evaluation for the legislature once each biennium.

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Oregon v. Moresco, Court of Appeals, A144016, filed June 13 2012.

Defendant appeals a judgment of conviction for giving false information to a police officer, ORS 162.385(1)(b), arguing that the trial court erred in denying her motion for a judgment of acquittal because no rational trier of fact could have found that the officer to whom she lied about her identity had asked for her name for the purpose of arresting her on a warrant. We reverse. ….” [Read full case.]

Read 2011 ORS 162.385(1)(b):

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We sometimes get this type of question:
Where can I find the laws governing the allowed size (height, weight, length, etc.) of trucks using the roads and streets in the county (or city or state)?
Imagine when there were no roads (how old are you!?), when there were only a few roads, when roads weren’t paved, when the people who owned the road could charge you any toll to allow you to pass – or not allow you to pass at all, remember, imagine ….  When either no one had jurisdiction over the roadways (and you lost a lot of wheels and limbs and livestock and horses) or when only private owners did and disputes were resolved in court, by handshake, or by gunfire.We now have laws (as if you didn’t already know that!) about those roads, many of which are public, so:
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If you Google the words: Oregon citizen arrest, you’ll get an immediate answer to just about anyone’s question about citizens arrests in Oregon, you’ll get a link to attorney Ray Thomas’s excellent and detailed website posts on the subject and links to the statute, ORS 153.058, and even to my previous OLR posts on citizen arrest rights.

Sarah Mirk wrote a recent article about a “citizens arrest” communication gap, which has nothing to do with a generation gap. I bet all these police officers and bicyclists have Internet at home and if anyone asked them a question, they would imediately go online.

If you walk or bicycle, I highly recommend that you keep a reference to the statute on a sticky note or on your smart-phone, and read the article:

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One possible answer to a frequently asked question in public law libraries: “Can I appeal my license suspension?

(Hurrah for the web. It was a lot harder in the “old days” to find this info. (But keep in mind, that it costs a whole lot more to maintain useful government websites than it took to answer telephones and print a directory or phonebook listing.))
Oregon DMV Administrative Review

Many people who receive a notice of suspension, revocation or cancellation from DMV are entitled to an Administrative Review. The notice you received from DMV will indicate if you are entitled to one (see below to learn how to request an Administrative Review).

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For my penultimate Traffic Week blog post, I give you these:

1) Transit musings: Try this transportation blog: Human Transit

2) Traffic law sometimes surprises: If you ever were in doubt about the truth of this statement, “if you read only what is written in the statutes and the constitutions you will be absolutely wrong about what the law is,” let the following be a wake-up call:

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